• David Cassidy, star of 70s TV hit The Partridge Family, dies aged 67David Cassidy, star of 70s TV hit The Partridge Family, dies aged 67

    Family statement says teen pop idol Cassidy died in Florida ‘surrounded by those he loved, with joy in his heart’US teen idol David Cassidy, best known as Keith Partridge on the hit 1970s series The Partridge Family, has died at the age of 67 from organ failure.Cassidy had been hospitalised in Florida for several days, after experiencing failure of the kidney and liver. Continue reading...

    The Guardian / 22 min. ago more
  • Chinese censor feted by Mark Zuckerberg is accused of corruptionChinese censor feted by Mark Zuckerberg is accused of corruption

    Lu Wei, powerful and flamboyant former head of China’s Cyberspace Administration, is accused of ‘serious disciplinary violations’The former top official for internet censorship in China, who travelled to the heart of Silicon Valley to promote China’s vision for the web, is under investigation for corruption, the Communist party’s anti-corruption agency has said.Lu Wei was the powerful and flamboyant head of the Cyberspace Administration of China from 2014 until June 2016 and he came to personify China’s model for internet control. He travelled to the United States, meeting with the CEOs of Facebook, Amazon and Apple, and held court when tech titans visited China. Continue reading...

    The Guardian / 24 min. ago more
  • Amazon spells black Friday for Australian retailers, but an early boon for consumersAmazon spells black Friday for Australian retailers, but an early boon for consumers

    Shoppers will benefit from lower prices as the online giant starts trading this week, in a major challenge to established stores It looks as though Black Friday will be the day when the US online behemoth Amazon opens its Australian site, sparking what is likely to be a major price war in the retail market.Amazon said 10 days ago its launch in Australia was “very close”. This week it reportedly sent emails to suppliers indicating it would have a soft launch on Thursday and formally begin trading on Friday. This coincides with the post-Thanksgiving shopping spree Black Friday, the biggest single day in the US retail calendar. Continue reading...

    Technology | The Guardian / 46 min. ago more
  • Sacha Baron Cohen offers to pay fines of tourists who wore 'Borat' mankinisSacha Baron Cohen offers to pay fines of tourists who wore 'Borat' mankinis

    The scantily clad Czech men were fined $68 each by police in Kazakhstan after they were detained in the country’s capitalComic actor Sacha Baron Cohen has offered to pay the fines for six Czech tourists who were reportedly detained by authorities in Kazakhstan’s capital Astana for dressing up as his character Borat. Continue reading...

    The Guardian / 1 h. 2 min. ago
  • Uber covered up massive hack that exposed data of 57m users and driversUber covered up massive hack that exposed data of 57m users and drivers

    Firm paid hackers $100,000 to delete data and keep breach quietChief security officer Joe Sullivan fired for concealing October 2016 breachUber concealed a massive global breach of the personal information of 57 million customers and drivers in October 2016, failing to notify the individuals and regulators, the company acknowledged on Tuesday.Uber also confirmed it had paid the hackers responsible $100,000 to delete the data and keep the breach quiet, which was first reported by Bloomberg. Continue reading...

    The Guardian / 1 h. 39 min. ago more
  • Olympic champion Gabby Douglas says she was abused by USA Gymnastics doctorOlympic champion Gabby Douglas says she was abused by USA Gymnastics doctor

    Allegations of abuse come after criticisms of victim shamingLarry Nassar faces life in prison if found guilty of sexual abuseOther Olympic gymnasts say they were victims of USA Gymnastics doctorGabby Douglas has become the third Olympic gold medalist to say she was abused by USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar.Douglas was widely criticized last week when she appeared to blame survivors of abuse, saying that saying that women should “dress modestly and be classy” to avoid enticing “the wrong crowd”. Those comments were in response to Aly Raisman, the US team captain at the London and Rio Games, who said she had been abused by Nassar. Continue reading...

    Sport | The Guardian / 2 h. 13 min. ago more
  • Danone invests in firm selling bottled water from ocean floorDanone invests in firm selling bottled water from ocean floor

    Water comes from a deep ocean current off the coast of Hawaii and is desalinated using reverse osmosisEvian and Volvic owner Danone has put money into a Hawaiian bottled water from the bottom of the Pacific Ocean, showing the depths multinationals will now go to in the quest for more revenue. The investment in Kona Deep, for an undisclosed sum, is the fifth in a year for Danone Manifesto Ventures, a fund the French food giant set up last year to invest in entrepreneurial companies, which are eating away at the dominance of big brands. Continue reading...

    The Guardian / 2 h. 34 min. ago more
  • Delhi police set up all-female motorbike squad to tackle crime against womenDelhi police set up all-female motorbike squad to tackle crime against women

    Five years after shocking gang rape, rapid response unit aims to combat assault and harassment in India’s crowded capitalDelhi’s police force has created an all-female motorcycle squad in an attempt to tackle rising crime against women, particularly in the city’s narrow alleyways. The patrol, called Raftaar (Speed), will deploy specially trained female officers on 600 motorbikes from December. They will carry regular firearms, body cameras, pepper spray and stun guns and work in pairs patrolling crowded, cramped areas of the city. Continue reading...

    The Guardian / 3 h. 6 min. ago more
  • Jürgen Klopp admits Liverpool stopped playing at half-time against SevillaJürgen Klopp admits Liverpool stopped playing at half-time against Sevilla

    • ‘The second half we became passive,’ says Liverpool manager• Klopp has yet to defeat Sevilla in seven attemptsJürgen Klopp claimed his Liverpool team stopped playing in a remarkable Champions League tie against Sevilla as they blew a three-goal interval lead and the chance to secure a place in the knockout stage as group winners. “It feels like we lost the game,” the Liverpool manager said.Two goals from Roberto Firmino plus a Sadio Mané header gave Liverpool a seemingly unassailable half-time lead against a Sevilla side who had not lost at home in 12 months. But a second-half fightback featuring two goals from Wissam Ben Yedder and an equaliser by Guido Pizarro in the third minute of injury time rekindled memories of the 2016 Europa League final between the clubs. The draw keeps Liverpool top of the group and needing a point at home to Spartak Moscow next month to progress. They would have been assured of qualification as group winners with victory in Spain. Continue reading...

    Sport | The Guardian / 3 h. 33 min. ago more
  • Doctors 'overprescribe drugs due to fears of facing complaints'Doctors 'overprescribe drugs due to fears of facing complaints'

    Survey suggests four-fifths of medics who have been subject of complaint or litigation start practising more ‘defensive medicine’Patients are being put at risk because doctors are giving them drugs they do not need and sending them for unnecessary surgery to avoid a complaint being made against them, research has revealed.Medics are so scared of being complained about that they are also giving patients more tests than their symptoms merit and not performing procedures that involve more risk than usual. Continue reading...

    UK | The Guardian / 3 h. 37 min. ago more
  • Hinkley Point C subsidy has dealt consumers 'a bad hand', say MPsHinkley Point C subsidy has dealt consumers 'a bad hand', say MPs

    Government accused of failing billpayers by agreeing to fixed price for 35-year contract that will cost £30bnMPs have accused the government of failing to protect consumers over the price it has promised to pay for power from the Hinkley Point C nuclear plant.The Commons public accounts committee said the subsidy contract for Hinkley Point C, agreed in 2016 after years of delays, would hit poorest households hardest. Continue reading...

    Economy | The Guardian / 3 h. 41 min. ago more
  • Champions League roundup: Cristiano Ronaldo sets record in Real rompChampions League roundup: Cristiano Ronaldo sets record in Real romp

    • Madrid forward scores his 18th Champions League goal of 2017• Napoli keep alive hopes of Champions League progressCristiano Ronaldo set another Champions League record as the holders Real Madrid sealed their place in the knockout stages with a 6-0 win at Apoel Nicosia. Zinedine Zidane’s team had the match won by half-time with goals from Luka Modric, Nacho and a Karim Benzema double. Ronaldo got his goals early in the second half, and his two strikes saw him reach 18 goals in the competition in 2017 – more than any single player in a calendar year. Related: Spurs secure top spot after Son Heung-min screamer sinks Borussia Dortmund Continue reading...

    Sport | The Guardian / 4 h. 10 min. ago more
  • Saad Hariri returns to Lebanon after surprise resignationSaad Hariri returns to Lebanon after surprise resignation

    Prime minister, who has renounced power, flies back into country on eve of its independence day after prolonged stay in Saudi Arabia Lebanon’s prime minister, Saad Hariri, returned to his home country late on Tuesday, on the eve of its independence day and after a nearly three-week absence dominated by his surprise resignation.Hariri stepped down from his post in a televised address on November 4 from Saudi Arabia and then remained in Riyadh, where he spent two weeks before making brief trips to Abu Dhabi, Paris and Cairo. Continue reading...

    The Guardian / 4 h. 16 min. ago more
  • America is about to kill the open internet – and towns like this will pay the priceAmerica is about to kill the open internet – and towns like this will pay the price

    Residents of Winlock, Washington can barely stream Spotify and Netflix. Changes to Obama’s net neutrality rules are going to make things even worseUS telecoms regulator unveils sweeping plans to dismantle net neutralityIt’s Saturday morning at a café near the museum in Winlock, Washington, and Michelle Conrow is eating brunch while surfing the internet on her laptop. What might seem a banal activity for many is a luxury for Michelle. The internet at her house just outside the town is primitive by today’s standards, with speeds similar to the dial-up days of the 1990s. It took three days to download Microsoft Office to her new computer.Many of the 1,300 residents in this rural area, which was once the US’s second largest egg producer, report frustratingly slow connections. There’s no binging on the latest must-watch Netflix show or streaming music on Spotify to suit your mood. No quick downloading of a podcast for your journey to work as you grab your coat. No running several devices simultaneously as parents catch up with internet banking or shopping on Amazon while their children chat on social media and watch YouTube videos. Continue reading...

    Technology | The Guardian / 4 h. 16 min. ago more
  • Manchester City grateful for Raheem Sterling’s late winner against FeyenoordManchester City grateful for Raheem Sterling’s late winner against Feyenoord

    Manchester City were threatening to end their winning sequence at 16 until Raheem Sterling turned a humdrum evening into a celebration with a goal two minutes from time. A 17th successive win in all competitions means City have won their group with a match to spare, though in fact that was already the case when Sterling played a give-and-go with Ilkay Gündogan and raced through to beat Brad Jones with an angled shot.Napoli’s goals against Shakhtar Donetsk had confirmed City’s untouchability at the top of Group F by that stage, and though this was far from one of their most memorable performances it could be excused on the grounds key players such as David Silva, Fernandinho and Leroy Sané were rested. And that City kept plugging away right until the end to achieve a win that hardly mattered. Pep Guardiola will have been pleased to see that, and so will the home supporters and compilers of records. “Raheem is a striker who scores important goals,” the manager said. “But he’s young, he can still improve. We can all do better.” Continue reading...

    Sport | The Guardian / 4 h. 46 min. ago more
  • Women's Ashes success a turning point in public interestWomen's Ashes success a turning point in public interest

    Attendance and viewing figures show that women’s cricket is capturing the Australian public’s imagination like never beforeIn July this year, everyone said that the World Cup final felt like a turning point. You don’t get 27,000 people to a women’s cricket match and not think that something extraordinary is going on. But the truth of turning points is that you can’t in the moment judge whether they’re real or perceived. It has taken the Women’s Ashes in Australia this past month to show the extent of the turn.Australia originally lagged behind England in embracing the game. The 2015 Ashes was played at intimate cricket grounds, selling out some matches with crowds in excess of 5000. The 2013-14 version in Australia was nowhere near that. Attendances at the Perth Test were in the low hundreds, while the Twenty20s were sparsely attended curtain-raisers for a meaningless men’s series. Continue reading...

    Sport | The Guardian / 4 h. 56 min. ago more
  • Ashes pressure is on Australia not England before first Test, insists RootAshes pressure is on Australia not England before first Test, insists Root

    • Captain brushes aside ‘bizarre’ claims tourists will be haunted by whitewash • Jake Ball’s return to full fitness suggests XI for the Gabba are settledJoe Root has offered a pointed reminder to Australia’s emboldened players that for all their talk of reopening psychological scars before Thursday’s first Test at the Gabba, it is England who have been the dominant force during recent Ashes encounters.The buildup to the opener in Brisbane has been awash with macho soundbites emanating chiefly from the home side, who have spoken of targeting players, unleashing bouncers and waging war – all with the whitewash of 2013-14 referenced heavily throughout. Continue reading...

    Sport | The Guardian / 5 h. 4 min. ago more
  • Sam Simmonds in line to replace injured Nathan Hughes for EnglandSam Simmonds in line to replace injured Nathan Hughes for England

    • Wasps No8 will be out for up to four weeks with knee problem• Alex Lozowski may start but Jonathan Joseph and Anthony Watson releasedSam Simmonds is poised for a first England start after Nathan Hughes was ruled out of England’s final autumn Test against Samoa on Saturday. Eddie Jones has also omitted the British & Irish Lions Anthony Watson and Jonathan Joseph in a number of changes made to his squad.Hughes misses out with a bruised knee while Charlie Ewels and Nick Isiekwe will be part of the match-day squad and Alex Lozowski is expected to feature, having been retained in the 25-man squad. Simmonds, 23, has made brief cameo appearances off the bench in both autumn Tests so far but with Hughes out for up to a month and Sam Underhill due to be rested, he is set to line up against Samoa. Continue reading...

    Sport | The Guardian / 5 h. 37 min. ago more
  • Spurs secure top spot after Son Heung-min screamer sinks Borussia DortmundSpurs secure top spot after Son Heung-min screamer sinks Borussia Dortmund

    When the time comes to pull the names out of the hat at Uefa headquarters next month, none of the second-placed teams will want to draw Tottenham Hotspur. There is no longer evidence of any inferiority complex when they rub shoulders with Europe’s elite and they will fancy themselves against anyone after winning Group H – at the expense of the mighty Real Madrid, no less – with a game to spare after this mature, resilient victory away to Borussia Dortmund. Related: Sevilla 2-2 Liverpool: Champions League – as it happened Continue reading...

    Sport | The Guardian / 5 h. 39 min. ago more
  • Is the NHS being taken for a ride on drug prices? We need to know | Nils PratleyIs the NHS being taken for a ride on drug prices? We need to know | Nils Pratley

    The competition watchdog is investigating, but we need a wider inquiry into pharmaceutical firms’ practicesThe Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) has discovered a rich seam for inquiries – pharmaceutical companies allegedly gouging the National Health Service.Pfizer, together with a small UK company called Flynn Pharma, was fined £90m last December for “excessive and unfair” pricing of an anti-epilepsy drug. GlaxoSmithKline and two small firms were later hit for £45m for conspiring to delay competition on an antidepressant. Continue reading...

    Opinion | The Guardian / 6 h. ago more
  • Donald Trump appears to back Roy Moore: 'Look, he denies it. He denies it'Donald Trump appears to back Roy Moore: 'Look, he denies it. He denies it'

    Trump speaks on sexual misconduct allegations and offers tacit endorsementPresident calls Moore’s Senate opponent Doug Jones ‘terrible on crime’Donald Trump finally weighed in on the sexual misconduct allegations that have engulfed the Senate candidate Roy Moore. The president’s comments seemed to amount to an endorsement. Related: Late-night hosts: 'There is now a lower bar to entry for the Senate than a mall in Alabama' Continue reading...

    The Guardian / 6 h. 1 min. ago more
  • Government backs down over EU human rights to avoid risk of defeatGovernment backs down over EU human rights to avoid risk of defeat

    Tories agree to work with rebel MP Dominic Grieve over keeping rights under EU law after BrexitMinisters have sought to see off a potential rebellion by Conservative MPs that could have brought a first defeat over the EU withdrawal bill by partially backing down on the future status of EU human rights measures in UK law.Following another day of debate about the bill, which seeks to transpose EU statute into UK law post-Brexit, the government faced possible defeat over amendments intended to maintain the scope of the EU charter on fundamental rights. Continue reading...

    UK | The Guardian / 6 h. 7 min. ago more
  • Electoral Commission documents reveal more details on Vote Leave donationsElectoral Commission documents reveal more details on Vote Leave donations

    Election watchdog reopens investigation into Vote Leave’s payments to a fashion student who then spent large sums with social media marketing firmFresh detail has emerged from the investigation into whether Vote Leave breached a £7m spending limit during the referendum campaign by donating £625,000 to a fashion student. The Electoral Commission has noted, in documents seen by the Guardian, that Darren Grimes, who was 23 at the time, was apparently able to coordinate large sums to be spent with a social media marketing firm before receiving official confirmation of the amounts Vote Leave were intending to give him. Continue reading...

    UK | The Guardian / 6 h. 20 min. ago more
  • John Lasseter taking leave from Pixar, citing 'missteps' and 'unwanted hugs'John Lasseter taking leave from Pixar, citing 'missteps' and 'unwanted hugs'

    The head of Disney Animation will take a six-month sabbatical after stating he has unintentionally made staff members feel ‘disrespected or uncomfortable’Disney Animation head John Lasseter will take a six-month leave of absence after confessing to unspecified “missteps”.In a company memo, obtained by the Hollywood Reporter, Lasseter writes that he has fallen short in creating a culture that engenders “support and collaboration” and hints at behavior that he has been confronted about. Continue reading...

    The Guardian / 6 h. 35 min. ago more
  • ‘I’m as good a defender as anyone,’ Chris Smalling tells England manager‘I’m as good a defender as anyone,’ Chris Smalling tells England manager

    • Manchester United defender ‘surprised’ by Gareth Southgate’s decision• José Mourinho to rest Young, Mata and Valencia against BaselChris Smalling has questioned Gareth Southgate’s judgment, saying he was surprised the England manager dropped him from the friendlies against Germany and Brazil for not being accomplished enough at playing from the back.Smalling also insisted that if he continued to perform successfully for Manchester United, Southgate would be forced to select him for the World Cup. Continue reading...

    Sport | The Guardian / 7 h. 4 min. ago more
  • B&Q and John Lewis warn of tough market as inflation and Brexit biteB&Q and John Lewis warn of tough market as inflation and Brexit bite

    Retailers say households facing squeeze on real incomes are putting off purchases as they go into key Christmas periodBritons are putting off major home appliance and furniture purchases and DIY projects, in the latest sign that household budgets are under pressure in the run-up to Christmas.On Tuesday, the DIY chain B&Q, the department store chain John Lewis and AO, the online electrical retailer, joined the list of companies warning of tough trading conditions, as the slowdown in the housing market has a knock-on effect on demand for everything from fitted kitchens and bathrooms to sofas and washing machines. Continue reading...

    Economy | The Guardian / 7 h. 17 min. ago more
  • Robert Mugabe resignation ushers in new era for ZimbabweRobert Mugabe resignation ushers in new era for Zimbabwe

    Jubilation in streets and parliament tinged with uncertainty about future following decades of authoritarian rule Robert Mugabe has resigned as president of Zimbabwe with immediate effect after 37 years in power, ushering in a new era for a country as uncertain as it is hopeful.The man who ruled with an autocrat’s grip for so many years finally caved to popular and political pressure hours after parliament launched proceedings to impeach him. Continue reading...

    The Guardian / 7 h. 38 min. ago more
  • Rodney Bewes, star of The Likely Lads, dies at 79Rodney Bewes, star of The Likely Lads, dies at 79

    Yorkshire-born actor also appeared in 1970s sequel, Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads?, again paired with James BolamThe actor Rodney Bewes, best known for his role as the northern working class hero Bob Ferris in The Likely Lads, has died aged 79.His agent, who said he would have turned 80 next week, made the announcement on Tuesday afternoon. Continue reading...

    UK | The Guardian / 7 h. 39 min. ago more
  • Amazon's $1bn bet on Lord of the Rings shows scale of its TV ambitionAmazon's $1bn bet on Lord of the Rings shows scale of its TV ambition

    Web giant has had a few minor triumphs, but remains behind rivals such as Netflix, with Disney and Apple also making movesFor a business so keen to emulate Hollywood, Amazon is putting in a matchless performance: it is embroiled in sexual harassment scandals and struggling to engage with audiences.The reverberations from the Harvey Weinstein furore took centre stage at Amazon Studios last weekend when Jeffrey Tambor, the star of Transparent, one of the unit’s few outright successes, quit as the show’s lead due to allegations of misconduct. Tambor has denied ever deliberately harassing anyone. Continue reading...

    Economy | The Guardian / 7 h. 43 min. ago more
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  • Philip Hammond’s budget cannot erase the stain on the soul of his party | Rafael BehrPhilip Hammond’s budget cannot erase the stain on the soul of his party | Rafael Behr

    Neither housebuilding nor tax breaks will do it. The Tories govern as if they despise those who backed remainPhilip Hammond’s budget faces political death by impossible demands. The question is how long he can defer the execution. The chancellor is supposed to maintain fiscal discipline and ease the pain of austerity. He must build houses, but not in anyone’s backyard. He must raise revenue, but not from taxes.And those are just pressures from inside the cabinet. If Hammond makes it through to the weekend without colleagues calling for him to be sacked, he’ll have beaten the odds. Continue reading...

    Opinion | The Guardian / 7 h. 50 min. ago more
  • Sugar industry withheld research effects of sucrose 50 years ago, study claimsSugar industry withheld research effects of sucrose 50 years ago, study claims

    Researchers say negative health impacts of sucrose could have been combated sooner had research been released – but industry bodies dispute the findingsSugar’s demise from childhood staple to public enemy can be seen everywhere. Chocolate bars are shrinking, sugary drinks are set to be taxed and our recommended daily sugar intake has been slashed in half. But the battle against sugar might have begun sooner if the industry hadn’t kept secrets to protect its commercial interests, according to new findings. In 1967, when scientists were arguing over the link between sugar consumption and increased risk of heart disease, researchers now claim that the International Sugar Research Foundation (ISRF) withheld findings that rats that were fed a high-sugar diet had higher levels of triglycerides (a fat found in the blood) than those fed starch. In a move researchers from the University of California at San Francisco have compared to the tobacco industry’s self-preservation tactics, the foundation stopped funding the project. Continue reading...

    World | The Guardian / 8 h. 1 min. ago more
  • Sven Mislintat, the scout Arsenal hope can revive their talent-spotting fortunesSven Mislintat, the scout Arsenal hope can revive their talent-spotting fortunes

    Arsenal’s new head of recruitment brought Robert Lewandowski to Borussia Dortmund – now Arsenal hope he can unearth similar gems for themThe decision to leave Borussia Dortmund to join Arsenal was not one Sven Mislintat made in a hurry. This sounds typical of a thoughtful, down-to-earth man who has made his reputation by looking, listening and trying to get a full picture rather than acting on rash instinct. Related: Arsenal appoint Dortmund scout Sven Mislintat as head of recruitment Continue reading...

    Sport | The Guardian / 8 h. 1 min. ago more
  • Police review 10,000 cases in forensics data 'manipulation' inquiryPolice review 10,000 cases in forensics data 'manipulation' inquiry

    Police investigate alleged manipulation at Manchester lab in mass recall of samples from criminal cases in England and WalesTen thousand criminal cases in England and Wales are being reviewed after it emerged that data at a forensic laboratory in Manchester may have been manipulated, causing the biggest recall of samples in British criminal justice history.A minister said the alleged data manipulation was discovered in 2017 at a lab run by Randox Testing, but the Guardian can reveal that warnings about the lab run by a predecessor company date back to 2012. Continue reading...

    UK | The Guardian / 8 h. 2 min. ago more
  • Going out or going out-out? Coordinate your outfit with your social calendar this party seasonGoing out or going out-out? Coordinate your outfit with your social calendar this party season

    Festive season is upon us, and the rules of going out are changing. Are you going out, out-out, or out-out-out? Here’s what to wear whether you’re having a drink after work or part of the straight thru crewGoing out used to mean just that: going out. A few drinks after work. Something hot, wrapped and sauced on the way home. Stinging flashbacks the next day. It was a simple time: you’d switch shoes in the loo when work was done, line your stomach with a pint of milk and head aimlessly into the night. But going out has changed and the going out spectrum has grown – clubs may be closing, but alternative parties and venues are opening in their place. Even the festive office party has become a high-profile event, filtered and shared with unfettered abandon on social media. Language about going out has changed accordingly. Now you have the option to go out, go out-out or – on say, New Year’s Eve when proper partying is law – even, out-out-out. And there’s a world of difference between them.The history of the phrase “going out-out” is up for debate. Some cite the Robert Frost poem Out, Out–, a meditation between death and life. Some talk about Macbeth whose speech after the death of his wife – “Out, out, brief candle!” – was a comment on the futility of life. Others look to 2009 and comedian Micky Flanagan’s skit on the difference between going out and going out-out which started a legal spat over intellectual property, when the directory enquiry company 118 118 used the phrase in an advert. Continue reading...

    Fashion | The Guardian / 8 h. 14 min. ago more
  • Germany’s crisis means uncertainty for Europe. But it won’t be fatal | Natalie NougayrèdeGermany’s crisis means uncertainty for Europe. But it won’t be fatal | Natalie Nougayrède

    The continent has been rattled at a time when it has so many unresolved issues. Macron’s plans, however, will be key – and Merkel is not finished yetThe collapse of Germany’s coalition talks is the latest shock to hit Europe. No one saw it coming. Of course the blow is of a different nature from the banking crisis, the war in Ukraine, the refugee crisis, Brexit, Trump, Poland and Hungary’s democratic backsliding, or Catalan secessionism. Germany’s politics look upended but the fundamentals are still in place: the postwar democratic set-up is hardly under threat. Still, this is rattling stuff. Europe’s powerhouse is in unknown political territory at a time when so much remains unresolved across the continent. And Germany’s political uncertainty means yet more uncertainty for the EU. Yet doomsayers shouldn’t assume that this crisis has to be fatal.Nowhere outside Germany is the political breakdown being watched more closely than in France. Emmanuel Macron had set his sights on the German election as the starting point of his plan for a European “renaissance” alongside Merkel. On Monday, Macron did not hide his concern, saying it was not in France’s interest that “things become tense” in Germany. “We must move forward,” he added. But the worries go deeper than Germany’s internal problems. If Merkel was supposed to be the leader of the free world in the era of Trump and Brexit then what might the future look like without her? Far-right websites have been humming with glee at the news that Merkel has now run into deep difficulty. Continue reading...

    Opinion | The Guardian / 8 h. 21 min. ago more
  • 'The people are free': Zimbabweans react to the fall of Robert Mugabe'The people are free': Zimbabweans react to the fall of Robert Mugabe

    News of resignation of the 93-year-old president spread fast and sparked celebrations in Harare and beyondThe news came at 5.30pm, as Zimbabwe’s MPs and senators debated a motion to impeach their president in the conference hall of a five-star hotel in Harare.Helton Bonongwe, the minister for parliamentary affairs, approached the stage holding a sheet of paper in his hand. There was a moment of silence, and then the hall erupted. After 37 years in power, Robert Mugabe had resigned. Continue reading...

    The Guardian / 8 h. 34 min. ago more
  • Jeremy Hunt accused of 'astonishing failure' after GP numbers fall by 1,190Jeremy Hunt accused of 'astonishing failure' after GP numbers fall by 1,190

    NHS figures show drop of 1,193 family doctors in past year, despite pledge to increase numbers by 5,000 by 2020 The number of GPs in England has fallen sharply in the past year, despite a government pledge to increase the supply of family doctors by 5,000. The total number of full-time equivalent GPs working in England dropped by 1,193 in the year to September, figures from NHS Digital show. Continue reading...

    UK | The Guardian / 8 h. 45 min. ago more
  • So you’re offended by an anti-Trump car sticker? You need to get out more | Tim DowlingSo you’re offended by an anti-Trump car sticker? You need to get out more | Tim Dowling

    When you get a sheriff on your case for putting something rude on your car, we’re losing the easygoing disrespect that once defined public spaceWe are now used to the idea that our online social spaces are a haven for gratuitous offence. Giving offence is seen as a right; taking offence a weakness. In situations where people are taking sides, offence is met with counter-offence, the coarser the better. Our virtual public forums are toxic environments.But what about actual public space, or what we used to describe in the old days as “going outside”? In public, especially in the US, attitudes towards offence have grown correspondingly prim, and the long-established boundaries between offence and free speech are being redrawn. Continue reading...

    Opinion | The Guardian / 8 h. 56 min. ago more
  • Nigeria mosque attack: suicide bomber kills dozensNigeria mosque attack: suicide bomber kills dozens

    Boko Haram thought to be behind devastating attack in Adamawa state in north-east of countryDozens of people have been killed by a suicide bomb attack during morning prayers in a mosque in north-east Nigeria.Boko Haram, the militant group that has killed tens of thousands of people and displaced millions in the region, is thought to be behind the attack in Mubi, a town in Adamawa state, but has not yet claimed it. Continue reading...

    World | The Guardian / 9 h. ago more
  • Three more women allege abuse by Caldey Island monkThree more women allege abuse by Caldey Island monk

    Survivors’ organisation demands inquiry into allegations against Father Thaddeus Kotik, who died in 1992Three more women have come forward to claim they were sexually abused by a Cistercian monk at Caldey Island abbey in the 1970s and 80s, as a survivors’ organisation demanded an inquiry into the allegations.Macsas, an organisation that supports survivors of clerical abuse, said an inquiry was needed to establish the extent of the alleged abuse. Meanwhile the children’s commissioner for Wales has asked the abbey for information on its child protection procedures. Continue reading...

    UK | The Guardian / 9 h. 8 min. ago more
  • US prosecutors charge Iranian with Game of Thrones hackUS prosecutors charge Iranian with Game of Thrones hack

    Behzad Mesri, alias Skote Vahshat, charged but whereabouts not revealedMesri allegedly demanded $6m from HBO not to release unaired episodes US prosecutors have charged an Iranian national with hacking into the HBO cable TV network and stealing episodes and plot summaries for unaired programs including Game of Thrones, then threatening to release the data unless he was paid $6m. Behzad Mesri, also known as Skote Vahshat, was charged with the hack in a sealed indictment that was released on Tuesday by the US attorney’s office in Manhattan. A spokesman with the US attorney’s office said Mesri had not been arrested, and declined to comment on the suspect’s whereabouts. Continue reading...

    World | The Guardian / 9 h. 16 min. ago more
  • Drag acts and drunken sailors – Mary Reid Kelley and Patrick Kelley: We Are Ghosts reviewDrag acts and drunken sailors – Mary Reid Kelley and Patrick Kelley: We Are Ghosts review

    Tate Liverpool In their bizarre black-and-white films, the Americans confront war and death – with a boisterous, cartoonish take on Das BootThe films of American artists Mary Reid Kelley and Patrick Kelley are, to use a technical term, bonkers. Actors and sets are rendered as though they inhabit a slapdash monochrome painting, rejigged as a silent-era black-and-white movie. The actors wear cartoonish theatrical makeup, which extends to cover their clothes and all the objects and furnishings that surround them. This, in itself, is arresting and strange. Somewhere between the avant garde and the amateur, between theatre and cartoon, history lesson and literature class, their films are equally curious in their subject matter. For their first UK exhibition in a public gallery, Mary and Patrick (the pair prefer to use their first names) are showing two films and a number of lightbox photographs. In one film, This Is Offal, we find ourselves witnessing the autopsy of a drowned woman. In the second, In The Body of the Sturgeon, we are on board a US submarine, somewhere in the Pacific, in the closing days of the second world war. Continue reading...

    Culture | The Guardian / 9 h. 17 min. ago more
  • Bosnian Serb warlord Ratko Mladić expected to be found guilty of genocideBosnian Serb warlord Ratko Mladić expected to be found guilty of genocide

    Guilty verdict likely for commander of Bosnian Serb army during 1992-95 warAbout 8,000 Muslim men and boys massacred at Srebrenica in 1995Ratko Mladić, the Serb warlord who terrorised Bosnia in the 1990s, is widely expected to be convicted on Wednesday for the last genocide committed in Europe. Related: Bosnia to appeal against 2007 ruling that cleared Serbia of genocide Continue reading...

    World | The Guardian / 9 h. 18 min. ago more
  • Francis Crick Institute's £700m building 'too noisy to concentrate'Francis Crick Institute's £700m building 'too noisy to concentrate'

    Some of the 1,250 people working at the year-old laboratory say its open plan layout, designed to produce collaboration, makes it hard to focus on workIt is a £700m cathedral to biomedical science, where scientists work together to make breakthroughs in cancer, neuroscience, pandemics and genetics. But the Francis Crick Institute is not proving to be the easiest place to concentrate.A year after opening, some of the 1,250 people working at the Crick Institute, in its central London laboratory, have complained that the open plan design, intended to assist informal collaboration, means some areas set aside for thinking and writing up research are too noisy. Continue reading...

    UK | The Guardian / 9 h. 23 min. ago more
  • Hundreds of rough sleepers in Manchester to be offered homesHundreds of rough sleepers in Manchester to be offered homes

    Social impact bond backs Andy Burnham’s pledge to eradicate local homelessness with cash for 270 homes and support planAt least 200 of Greater Manchester’s most entrenched rough sleepers will be given new homes, and the support needed to stay in them, after a £1.8m grant from an ethical investment fund.Under the scheme, financed by the social impact bond, 15 of Greater Manchester’s housing providers, as well as two private-rented sector partners, have offered 270 properties for homeless people. The plan forms part of the new Greater Manchester Homes Partnership. Continue reading...

    UK | The Guardian / 9 h. 25 min. ago more
  • Rule of law in UK at risk after Brexit, says former supreme court presidentRule of law in UK at risk after Brexit, says former supreme court president

    Top legal figures point to ‘very real problem’ of UK judges facing political pressure when interpreting ECJ decisionsThe legal implications of leaving the EU have not been thought through, could overwhelm the supreme court and endanger the independence of the British judiciary, four senior retired judges have warned.Giving evidence to a parliamentary select committee, Lord Thomas, Lord Neuberger, Lord Hope and Sir Konrad Schiemann signalled reservations about the difficulties of preserving the rule of law after Brexit. Continue reading...

    UK | The Guardian / 9 h. 29 min. ago more
  • New Zealand hit with another outbreak of mumps as they prepare for WalesNew Zealand hit with another outbreak of mumps as they prepare for Wales

    • Ardie Savea is in isolation at the team’s Cardiff hotel• ‘We are taking it seriously and the doctor reacted really quickly’New Zealand have been hit by a second outbreak of mumps on their tour but are confident it has been contained before their final match against Wales on Saturday.The flanker Ardie Savea is in isolation in the All Blacks’ Cardiff hotel after being diagnosed with the virus despite being vaccinated as a boy. He follows the wing Reiko Ioane, who contracted it earlier on the tour and after recovering, injured a shoulder in the win against Scotland last Saturday. Continue reading...

    Sport | The Guardian / 9 h. 44 min. ago more
  • Argentinian submarine search intensifies as fears grow for crewArgentinian submarine search intensifies as fears grow for crew

    Missing naval vessel ARA San Juan would only have one day’s worth of oxygen reserves left after six days without contactA massive search and rescue operation has intensified to find the Argentinian navy submarine ARA San Juan that went missing six days ago in the South Atlantic.If the crew are still alive the submarine would only have one day’s worth of oxygen reserves left. If the vessel is found, a submarine rescue chamber (SCR) will be lowered to couple with the vessel’s hatch and bring the crew up to the surface six members at a time. Continue reading...

    The Guardian / 9 h. 48 min. ago more
  • Two victims of separate London knife attacks die in hospitalTwo victims of separate London knife attacks die in hospital

    Teenagers in Walthamstow and Northolt are 33rd and 34th young people to die after stabbings in capital this yearTwo murder investigations have been launched in London after teenagers critically injured in knife attacks last week died in hospital. The two victims, both 18-year-old males, were stabbed in separate attacks in Walthamstow and Northolt. Their names have not yet been released. Continue reading...

    UK | The Guardian / 10 h. 17 min. ago more
  • Instaglam: how to get your party make-up to stay putInstaglam: how to get your party make-up to stay put

    There’s makeup and there’s festive party makeup, a chance to go all out. To make sure your look lasts all night, or at least until the night bus comes, here are five easy steps to get your face prepped and primed Party season requires a little more dedication to ensure your makeup stays in place. Here’s how to get a full-coverage look that won’t budge. Continue reading...

    Fashion | The Guardian / 10 h. 39 min. ago more
  • Apple under fire over reports students worked illegal overtime to build iPhone XApple under fire over reports students worked illegal overtime to build iPhone X

    Manufacturing partner Foxconn had student interns working 11-hour days to make £999 iPhone Apple has been accused of relying on students working illegal overtime to build the iPhone X, through its contractor Foxconn, which manufactures the devices in Zhengzhou, China.According to the Financial Times, students working at the Foxconn plant, as part of a three month “work experience” placement, were routinely working 11-hour days assembling the newest phone, breaking Chinese overtime laws in the process. Continue reading...

    World | The Guardian / 10 h. 41 min. ago more
  • UK water firms admit using divining rods to find leaks and pipesUK water firms admit using divining rods to find leaks and pipes

    Calls for regulator to stop companies passing cost of using discredited medieval practice on to customersTen of the 12 water companies in the UK have admitted they are still using the practice of water dowsing despite the lack of scientific evidence for its effectiveness.The disclosure has prompted calls for the regulator to stop companies passing the cost of a discredited medieval practice on to their customers. Ofwat said any firm failing to meet its commitments to customers faced a financial penalty. Continue reading...

    UK | The Guardian / 10 h. 41 min. ago more
  • Channel Nine cricket commentary team's lack of diversity is out of touch | Kate O'HalloranChannel Nine cricket commentary team's lack of diversity is out of touch | Kate O'Halloran

    The white, middle-aged male banter is emblematic of the culture of privilege that pervades Australia’s favourite sportsChannel Nine last week announced that “Australia’s favourite voices of the summer” would commentate the 2017-18 Ashes series. According to Nine, they are: Bill Lawry, Ian Healy, Michael Slater, Mark Taylor, Ian Chappell, Michael Clarke and Shane Warne (with Michael Vaughan and Kevin Pietersen to appear later to make up the English component of the team). The Englishman Mark Nicholas will anchor.In case the monotony isn’t evident upon reading, Wide World of Sports helpfully posted a photo on social media of the eight white men in various shades of blue and black suits. Unsurprisingly, the photo went on to draw the ire of an especially acerbic Twitter audience. Continue reading...

    Sport | The Guardian / 10 h. 42 min. ago more
  • Comedy in a care home: the standups taking slapstick into new territoryComedy in a care home: the standups taking slapstick into new territory

    The residents were expecting bingo. Instead they got lessons in strawberry spitting, a Railway Children spoof – and a stuntman stripping to his underpants…Monday afternoon is usually bingo time at the Madelayne Court care home, in the village of Broomfield, near Chelmsford. So today’s activity comes as a surprise to many comfortably seated residents: striding on stage in front of them is former Neighbours actor Nathan Lang – he’s dressed as a stuntman and preparing to leap through a hoop he’s pretending is on fire. “You’ve lost it!” hollers one elderly spectator, and Lang does look momentarily perplexed. How do you deal with hecklers here? Continue reading...

    Culture | The Guardian / 10 h. 49 min. ago more
  • UK environment department using 1,400 disposable coffee cups a dayUK environment department using 1,400 disposable coffee cups a day

    Figures show more than 2.5m cups were purchased in the past five years despite pledges by the environment secretary to tackle growing plastic waste More than 2.5m disposable cups have been purchased by the UK’s environment department for use in its restaurants and cafes over the past five years – equivalent to nearly 1,400 a day. The Liberal Democrats’ environment spokesman, Tim Farron, said the revelation, obtained through a freedom of information request, showed Michael Gove “needs to get his own house in order” in light of his public pledges to tackle the growing scourge of plastic pollution. Continue reading...

    UK | The Guardian / 10 h. 53 min. ago more
  • David LaChapelle: ‘I never wanted to shoot another pop star – I was tortured by them’David LaChapelle: ‘I never wanted to shoot another pop star – I was tortured by them’

    His lurid aesthetic shaped the celebrity age, but 11 years ago LaChapelle escaped to a farm in Hawaii. He talks about his journey from 14-year-old gay runaway in Warhol’s New York to enlightened ‘Grandpa Moses of photography’The evening before we are due to meet, David LaChapelle spends several hours greeting fans and signing books in Berlin. The queue snakes outside his publisher Taschen’s bookshop and down the street. One woman, a middle-aged artist, bares her breasts for a photo with him. Another gets her wrist signed and returns later to show she got it tattooed. The next afternoon, LaChapelle, no stranger to daft behaviour, can only shrug, touched but baffled. He wasn’t sure there would be interest in this comeback; his two new anthologies are going to be his final books. This is it, he promises. An edit of unseen photos from his 30-year career as one of the most striking and controversial chroniclers of pop culture.“For a long time, I worked non-stop,” he says. “I had to always have three magazine covers, a music video in the Top 10 of [MTV chart show] TRL, one of the Vogues happening or I’d be forgotten and irrelevant.” Continue reading...

    Culture | The Guardian / 10 h. 54 min. ago more
  • US telecoms regulator unveils sweeping plans to dismantle net neutralityUS telecoms regulator unveils sweeping plans to dismantle net neutrality

    FCC to reverse Obama-era rules designed to protect open internetAjit Pai says Obama government exercised ‘heavy-handed regulation’The top US telecoms regulator has unveiled sweeping plans to overturn Obama-era rules designed to protect an open internet. Related: Tim Berners-Lee on the future of the web: 'The system is failing' Continue reading...

    Technology | The Guardian / 11 h. 6 min. ago more
  • Shiv Thakor sacked by Derbyshire after exposing himself to two womenShiv Thakor sacked by Derbyshire after exposing himself to two women

    • Derbyshire terminate contract after guilty verdict• ‘The club is opposed to sexual harassment in any form’Derbyshire County Cricket Club has terminated Shiv Thakor’s contract with immediate effect after the cricketer was found guilty of exposing himself to two women.“The club expects the highest standards of behaviour from all its staff and is opposed to sexual harassment in any form,” Derbyshire stated on their website. Continue reading...

    Sport | The Guardian / 11 h. 22 min. ago more
  • The 'masculine mystique' – why men can't ditch the baggage of being a blokeThe 'masculine mystique' – why men can't ditch the baggage of being a bloke

    Far from embracing the school run, most men are still trapped by rigid cultural notions of being strong, dominant and successful. Is it leading to an epidemic of unhappiness similar to the one felt by Betty Friedan’s 50s housewives?Back in the 90s, it was all going to be so different. Not for our generation the lopsided approach of our parents, with their quaint postwar notions of father-breadwinners and mother-homemakers. We would be equal; interchangeable. Our young women would run companies, embassies, hospitals and schools, while our young men, no slouches themselves, would punctuate their careers with long, halcyon spells dandling babies and teaching toddlers how to make tiny volcanoes out of vinegar and baking soda.That equality would have formidable knock-on effects. The gender pay gap would narrow. Sexual harassment wouldn’t disappear, but decoupling professional power from gender would do a lot to erase it from the workplace. Continue reading...

    The Guardian / 11 h. 35 min. ago more
  • Graduate in £1m claim was badly let down by Oxford, court toldGraduate in £1m claim was badly let down by Oxford, court told

    Lawyer for Faiz Siddiqui, who alleges ‘inadequate’ teaching stunted his career, says low 2:1 was ‘huge disappointment’An Oxford graduate is suing the university for £1m on the grounds that his failure to get a top degree 17 years ago cost him the chance of a lucrative legal career.Faiz Siddiqui alleges the “inadequate” teaching he received on the Indian special subject part of his modern history course resulted in him getting only a low upper second degree when he took his finals in June 2000 instead of a first or high 2:1. Continue reading...

    UK | The Guardian / 11 h. 45 min. ago more
  • more news
  • Ashley seeks improvement in Staveley’s near-£300m bid for Newcastle UnitedAshley seeks improvement in Staveley’s near-£300m bid for Newcastle United

    • Amanda Staveley’s PCP Capital Partners in negotiations over buyout• Potential new owners want to see Rafael Benítez stay as managerMike Ashley wants Amanda Staveley to improve her offer for Newcastle United before he considers accelerating the pace of takeover talks.A formal, near-£300m bid from Staveley’s Dubai-based financial advisory firm, PCP Capital Partners, lies on the Newcastle owner’s table but adjustments will need to be made and compromises reached before Ashley broadly accepts an offer to buy him out at St James’ Park. Continue reading...

    Economy | The Guardian / 11 h. 57 min. ago more
  • This isn’t the start of an NHS crisis – it’s far worse | Jan FilochowskiThis isn’t the start of an NHS crisis – it’s far worse | Jan Filochowski

    The shortfalls are chronic, widespread and growing. I’ve turned failing health trusts around – I can see the service needs a modern-day Marshall plan• Jan Filochowski is a former NHS chief executiveSaying the NHS was already in crisis, as I – and a few other Jeremiahs – did two years ago, meant going out on a limb. Today, hardly anyone says anything else, not least because virtually all our dire predictions have become realities. Even public officials responsible for running and inspecting the NHS, who couldn’t be seen for dust then (the heads of NHS England, NHS Improvement and the Care Quality Commission), are going public on the gravity of the situation and begging the chancellor to do something in this week’s budget.Indeed, how could anyone say things are OK when, in response to an increase in the past seven years of at most 15% in A&E attendances and admissions, waits in A&E have gone up by 350% and waits for admission by 550%? Increasing waiting times are the canary in the mine. Continue reading...

    Opinion | The Guardian / 11 h. 57 min. ago more
  • Airbus boss says Brexit risks losing UK aviation's 'crown jewels' to ChinaAirbus boss says Brexit risks losing UK aviation's 'crown jewels' to China

    UK operations chief tells MPs trade barriers and restricted movement for staff will put thousands of jobs in Wales at riskAirbus has told MPs that Britain risks losing the “crown jewels” of its aviation industry to China as a result of Brexit, putting up to 7,000 wing-manufacturing jobs in Wales at risk.The company’s senior corporate representative in the UK warned the business select committee that the threat of new customs bureaucracy and reduced employee mobility could deter long-term investment and accelerate a shift to Asia. Continue reading...

    Economy | The Guardian / 12 h. 22 min. ago more
  • Late-night hosts: 'There is now a lower bar to entry for the Senate than a mall in Alabama'Late-night hosts: 'There is now a lower bar to entry for the Senate than a mall in Alabama'

    Comics, including Stephen Colbert and Seth Meyers, addressed Trump’s tweets about Lavar Ball and his refusal to denounce Senate candidate Roy MooreLate-night hosts on Monday discussed Donald Trump’s feud with LaVar Ball, the father of one of three UCLA basketball players arrested in China on suspicion of shoplifting sunglasses, and the White House’s unwillingness to denounce the Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore. Related: Late-night hosts: 'We men are complicit in perpetuating a culture that devalues women' Continue reading...

    Culture | The Guardian / 12 h. 32 min. ago more
  • Russian nuclear facility denies it is source of high radioactivity levelsRussian nuclear facility denies it is source of high radioactivity levels

    Greenpeace calls for investigation after levels of ruthenium-106 in atmosphere near Urals site found to be 986 times normRussian radiation leak: everything you need to knowA secretive Russian nuclear facility has denied it was behind high atmospheric concentrations of the radioactive isotope ruthenium-106, after Russia’s meteorological service confirmed levels several hundred times the norm were found in several locations in the country during tests in late September.Greenpeace has called for an investigation into a potential cover-up of a nuclear accident after Russia’s nuclear agency had denied European reports of increased ruthenium-106 levels. Rosgidromet, the weather monitoring service, released test data on Monday that showed levels were indeed much higher than normal. The most potent site was Argayash in the south Urals, where levels were 986 times the norm. Continue reading...

    Environment | The Guardian / 12 h. 36 min. ago more
  • How to drink wine: a quick guide for Theresa MayHow to drink wine: a quick guide for Theresa May

    Russian state TV criticised the PM for not holding her wine glass by its stem – so here are three tips to help her perfect her etiquetteGiven the tales of Russian trolls infiltrating British media, we perhaps should not attach too much weight to Russian state TV’s recent takedown of Theresa May’s dress sense. There is one element of current affairs show Vesti Nedeli’s critique, however, on which I think we can all agree. “She didn’t pick up her glass by the stem, as is common practice in respectable society,” noted an outraged Dmitry Kiselev. Quite right too, Dmitry.Such behaviour might not be quite so egregious coming from, say, the US president. It might not even be such a faux pas at the office party. But if you are trying to blend into the upper echelons of international diplomacy, it is a surefire way to betray the fact that you are out of your depth. It is the kind of faux pas that Sean Connery remarks upon when Spectre spook Robert Shaw orders a chianti with his dover sole in From Russia With Love: “Red wine with fish; that should have told me something.” (Red with fish is actually perfectly acceptable, by the way, though I would suggest a red burgundy rather than the chianti that Shaw chose.) Continue reading...

    Lifestyle | The Guardian / 12 h. 43 min. ago more
  • Trans women need access to rape and domestic violence services. Here’s why | Shon FayeTrans women need access to rape and domestic violence services. Here’s why | Shon Faye

    All women face similar dangers, whether trans or not, and it’s distressing that some people seek to drive a wedge between our rightsTrans people in Britain have recently been subjected to a media onslaught from all sides. The attack has largely been centred on proposed reform to the Gender Recognition Act 2004 (GRA), which would enable trans people to change their legal gender without a pathologising medical process. Disturbingly, this has been repackaged as a threat to women-only spaces – which could be “invaded” by any person born male who now identifies as a woman.The idea seems to be that this is a question of the “competing rights” of trans and cis (non-trans) women. But this rhetoric of competition is a dead end – ultimately it isn’t a discussion or a debate, but an impasse. Its logical conclusion is a crushing ultimatum: trans rights or women’s rights. Only one can win. Continue reading...

    Opinion | The Guardian / 13 h. 37 min. ago more
  • Google plans to 'de-rank' Russia Today and Sputnik to combat misinformationGoogle plans to 'de-rank' Russia Today and Sputnik to combat misinformation

    Alphabet chief executive Eric Schmidt says Google and other tech companies must act against state-run Russian news agencies to stop spread of falsehoodsEric Schmidt, the chief executive of Google’s parent company Alphabet, has said the search engine is preparing to take action against state-run Russian news agencies, including Russia Today and Sputnik, which are accused of spreading propaganda by US intelligence agencies.“We’re working on detecting this kind of scenario ... and de-ranking those kinds of sites,” Schmidt said, in response to a question at an event in Halifax, Canada. “It’s basically RT and Sputnik. We’re well aware and we’re trying to engineer the systems to prevent it.” Continue reading...

    World | The Guardian / 13 h. 40 min. ago more
  • EasyJet profits plunge despite record passenger numbersEasyJet profits plunge despite record passenger numbers

    Airline says it has been a ‘difficult’ year, with the weak pound bringing extra costs of more than £100mEasyJet saw its profits fall 17% last year, with more than £100m lost due to the slump in the pound after the Brexit vote.The airline reported a record year for passenger numbers, flying 80.2 million people, almost 10% more than in 2015-16, on ever fuller planes. Continue reading...

    Economy | The Guardian / 13 h. 46 min. ago more
  • Drug firm Concordia overcharged NHS with 6,000% price rise, says watchdogDrug firm Concordia overcharged NHS with 6,000% price rise, says watchdog

    CMA accuses Canadian firm of overcharging by £100m on thyroid drug with price per pack rising from £4.46 to £258 in 10 yearsConcordia International, the Canadian drug company, has overcharged the NHS by more than £100m in the past decade for a life-changing thyroid drug, according to Britain’s competition watchdog.The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) said it had provisionally found that Concordia had “abused its dominant position to overcharge the NHS” by hiking the price of liothyronine, used to treat patients with an underactive thyroid, by nearly 6,000% between 2007 and 2017. Continue reading...

    Economy | The Guardian / 13 h. 51 min. ago more
  • Getting on a plane last if I’ve got the cheapest ticket? Sounds like a good deal | Nigel KendallGetting on a plane last if I’ve got the cheapest ticket? Sounds like a good deal | Nigel Kendall

    BA may be trying to take us for a ride – but I don’t want to spend more time than strictly necessary in a seat seam-welded to my backside anywayInfrequent flyers have been in a flap this week, following British Airways’ announcement that it is to board passengers according to how much they paid for their ticket. BA claims that the new procedure will simplify the boarding process by allocating all passengers a number between one and five, with five being the lowest of the low and therefore the last to get on.The hive mind of Twitter, which enjoys change as much as Nigel Farage enjoys a trip to Strasbourg, has reacted with clinical sang-froid. Only kidding. It all kicked off, with some complaining that the policy was tantamount to introducing poor doors to the skies, with BA flying the flag for the British class system. Continue reading...

    Opinion | The Guardian / 14 h. 4 min. ago more
  • AT&T's Time Warner takeover: justice department aims to block $85bn dealAT&T's Time Warner takeover: justice department aims to block $85bn deal

    AT&T has already signaled it will go to court if the deal is blocked, potentially setting up one of the biggest legal battles over a corporate merger in decadesThe US Department of Justice on Monday moved to block AT&T’s $85bn takeover of Time Warner, one of the largest media deals ever announced. Related: Trump administration uses CNN as bargaining chip in Time Warner-AT&T deal Continue reading...

    Economy | The Guardian / 14 h. 4 min. ago more
  • Uber wants to cure travel sickness with light, air blasts and moving seatsUber wants to cure travel sickness with light, air blasts and moving seats

    Patent reveals system designed to stimulate self-driving car passengers to eliminate motion sickness so they can read, work or play in transitUber is working on a system to prevent travel sickness in cars, which it sees as a barrier to the adoption of self-driving vehicles, stopping people from doing other things as they are ferried to their destination.According to a patent, which describes a “sensory stimulation system for autonomous vehicles”, Uber plans to use vibrating and moving seats, the flow of air targeting the face or other part of the body, and light bars and screens to prevent passengers from feeling travel sick. Continue reading...

    Technology | The Guardian / 14 h. 22 min. ago more
  • Brexit: IoD ups pressure on May with call for transition deal by MarchBrexit: IoD ups pressure on May with call for transition deal by March

    Business group warns that failure to secure deal by end of financial year would force firms to trigger contingency plansTheresa May would need to secure a clear Brexit transition agreement by March if she wanted to avoid a “snowballing” number of companies activating contingency plans and even moving operations out of the UK, the Institute of Directors will warn.Stephen Martin, director general of the business group, is to issue the ultimatum to the government at the IoD annual dinner on Tuesday, saying “all we want for Christmas is progress on Brexit”. Continue reading...

    Economy | The Guardian / 14 h. 33 min. ago more
  • Jools Holland webchat – your questions answered on punk, Amy Winehouse and his favourite rapperJools Holland webchat – your questions answered on punk, Amy Winehouse and his favourite rapper

    The bandleader and television presenter has tickled ivories with the biggest names in music. He told us which musician he’s most in awe of, what late legend he’d like to spend eternity with and his peculiar fear of dying 1.05pm GMT Thank you so much for joining me and taking the time to think up your eloquent questions. I hope you found my answers satisfactory. I have the honour to remain your humble and obedient servant. I'm sorry there wasn't time to answer them all. 1.04pm GMT 25aubrey asks:Of all the people you’ve sat alongside tickling the ivories with, who were you most in awe of?I think many of us will be in awe of the people who we have idolised since our childhood. I remember listening to Gladys Knight when I was a teenager and going to see her at the Lewisham Odeon. So when she ended up sitting next to me at the piano stool, I felt like I was in some kind of lovely dream. But it's no good being dozy because you've got to remember the key and chords etc. Once the music starts, you forget all of that and just become the servant of the song. Once it's over, instead of being back to reality, you're back in this incredible dream sitting next to an idol. I would also mention Eartha Kitt as an example of somebody who inspired awe as she was one of the originators from the jazz age and there are not many of those left now. And finally, the person that still inspires me each night on stage, who has more fire and thunder than anyone I've ever seen, is our own Ruby Turner, who has that mix of church and the blues and coming from the heart. Continue reading...

    Culture | The Guardian / 14 h. 37 min. ago more
  • UK  manufacturing order books at strongest level since 1988, CBI saysUK manufacturing order books at strongest level since 1988, CBI says

    Global demand for British goods and weak pound bring sharp improvement in both total and export order booksOrder books for Britain’s factories are at their strongest for almost 30 years as the weak pound and global growth bolsters demand for manufactured goods.In a boost to the chancellor on the eve of the budget, the CBI’s monthly health check of industry showed a sharp improvement in both total and export order books. Continue reading...

    Economy | The Guardian / 14 h. 45 min. ago more
  • Paperchase rejecting the Daily Mail is another victory against hatred | Owen JonesPaperchase rejecting the Daily Mail is another victory against hatred | Owen Jones

    One of the most vindictive bullies in Britain has the chutzpah to say Paperchase was bullied into dropping its ads. This is a rightwing press lashing out from its death spiralPaperchase bowing to pressure from campaigners and committing to no longer advertising in the Daily Mail has upset all the right people. It is a victory for basic decency. Britain’s tabloids are among the most hateful and vicious in the western world. They have long dictated what is deemed politically permissible – rallying behind policies that benefit the country’s rich elite, and either ignoring or demonising ideas, individuals and movements that challenge our unjust status quo. One of their key roles has been to deflect anger at injustice away from the powerful vested interests at the top, to scapegoats instead: immigrants, refugees, public sector workers, benefit claimants, you name it. Related: Paperchase apologises for Daily Mail promotion after online backlash Continue reading...

    Opinion | The Guardian / 15 h. 12 min. ago more
  • I was a victim of undercover police abuse. I fear we won’t get justice | AlisonI was a victim of undercover police abuse. I fear we won’t get justice | Alison

    Here in the Royal Courts of Justice we are listening for crumbs of information about the officers who used and abused us. But nothing is revealedI’ve been researching undercover policing ever since the boyfriend I knew as Mark Cassidy left me in spring 2000. Like the other female activists bringing cases of undercover police abuse to light, I have become skilled in scouring documents, interrogating and interpreting evidence. We’ve fought a legal case against the Metropolitan police to expose its institutional sexist practices, and waited for five years for an apology that should have been given much earlier. Related: Police spies: in bed with a fictional character Continue reading...

    Opinion | The Guardian / 15 h. 18 min. ago more
  • 'You'll never work again': women tell how sexual harassment broke their careers'You'll never work again': women tell how sexual harassment broke their careers

    Actors, writers, assistants, comedians and journalists speak out about the toll that sexual assault and harassment in the workplace took on their futuresAs women come forward with accusations of sexual harassment in politics, media, entertainment and other fields, following the flood of allegations against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein, it is striking how many of their stories share the same ending.Either the alleged abuse, the victim’s refusal to stay quiet, or both, slams the door on critical job opportunities and puts a serious – sometimes terminal – dent in her career. In some cases the victim never works in her industry again. Continue reading...

    World | The Guardian / 15 h. 34 min. ago more
  • Widening UK budget deficit hands Hammond a headacheWidening UK budget deficit hands Hammond a headache

    Rise in public sector net borrowing points to weaker economy than expected and will further limit chancellor’s spending powerBritain’s deficit unexpectedly widened in October, handing Philip Hammond disappointing news on the eve of the budget. Public sector net borrowing last month, excluding the nationalised banks, grew by £500m to £8bn compared with October a year ago, according to the Office for National Statistics (ONS). Continue reading...

    Economy | The Guardian / 15 h. 37 min. ago more
  • Mel Gibson: Weinstein scandal is a 'precursor to change'Mel Gibson: Weinstein scandal is a 'precursor to change'

    Star, dogged by claims of racist and misogynistic behaviour, says he welcomes ‘light being thrown where there were shadows’Mel Gibson has spoken out about the sexual harassment scandal in Hollywood, saying the wave of accusations against Harvey Weinstein have been “painful” but will lead to change in the industry. The actor and Oscar-winning director, who has faced repeated damaging allegations of racist and misogynistic behaviour, said: “Things got shaken up a little bit and there is a lot of light being thrown into places where there were shadows and that is kind of healthy. It’s painful, but I think pain is a precursor to change.” Continue reading...

    World | The Guardian / 15 h. 45 min. ago more
  • Danni Wyatt hundred gives England T20 win over Australia to tie seriesDanni Wyatt hundred gives England T20 win over Australia to tie series

    • Australia 178-2; England 181-6 – England win by four wickets• Beth Mooney also hits century for Australia but tourists level seriesThrough the most daring of hands, Danni Wyatt steered England to the least likely of wins, the visitors ending their Ashes campaign by knocking off the highest successful run chase in the history of women’s Twenty20 internationals. In turn, Heather Knight’s side head home having levelled the overall series at 8-8 after winning the last two rubbers.When England lost three wickets in five overs to begin their response to 178 for two they looked to have given up any realistic chance. The game had a familiar look: the required run rate would rocket as wickets fell. It had all the symptoms of a shocker to never be spoken of again, save for Beth Mooney’s relentless century earlier on. Continue reading...

    Sport | The Guardian / 16 h. 6 min. ago more
  • Poland faces €100,000-a-day fines over illegal logging in Białowieża forestPoland faces €100,000-a-day fines over illegal logging in Białowieża forest

    Poland is given two weeks to end its destruction of the Unesco-protected forest in a landmark ruling by the European court of justicePoland has been given two weeks to stop illegal deforestation in the Unesco-protected Białowieża forest or face fines of at least €100,000 a day.In a precedent-setting ruling that will echo across the EU, the European court of justice ordered Poland to show it was acting lawfully in the ancient woodland, or face a €36.5m (£32m) annual penalty. Continue reading...

    Environment | The Guardian / 16 h. 21 min. ago more
  • Naomi Shimada: the model making sure positive body image isn't a fadNaomi Shimada: the model making sure positive body image isn't a fad

    The activist is aiming to dismantle tokenism in the fashion world. Since leaving diets and demands behind, as a size 14-16, she’s been working hard to both challenge and reclaim the ‘plus-sized’ label Naomi Shimada is seventh in The ChainIn March, American Vogue named model and body image activist Naomi Shimada a “street style star to watch”, applauding her “feminist work”. But 30-year-old Shimada – who has been photographed by lensmen such as Rankin – wants plus-size (the bracket in which she models) to not just be tokenistic diversity at a runway show or in a magazine’s body-themed issue, but an inclusive fashion commitment. Continue reading...

    Fashion | The Guardian / 16 h. 53 min. ago more
  • Jennifer Egan and M John Harrison – books podcastJennifer Egan and M John Harrison – books podcast

    On this week’s show, we examine the writing life with a Pulitzer winner who is not afraid to experiment and a genre-busting author with his most radical collection of short stories yet This week we welcome M John Harrison, who comes to the studio to discuss his most radical collection of short stories yet, You Should Come With Me Now. He tells us about grounding strange fiction in normality, baffling the reader and why writing weird fiction has got harder in the era of Trump.We also hear from Jennifer Egan, who came to a Guardian Live event to talk about her Pulitzer prize-winning novel, A Visit from the Goon Squad, and her latest novel, Manhattan Beach. Her devoted fans quizzed her about time, technology and how the chronology of publication doesn’t always reflect the order in which novels emerge from the writer’s pen. Continue reading...

    Culture | The Guardian / 17 h. 27 min. ago more
  • Building houses and saving the NHS: how Lib Dems would tackle this budget | Vince CableBuilding houses and saving the NHS: how Lib Dems would tackle this budget | Vince Cable

    Urgent cash is needed for our ailing health service and those affected by corrosive benefit cuts. We have a plan which doesn’t rely on a magic money tree• Vince Cable is the leader of the Liberal DemocratsThere is a risk that this week’s budget will be drowned out by Brexit and ministerial mishaps. But it really matters because the economy is in a precarious position.The chancellor’s task is not easy. He can’t depart too far from his deficit reduction targets without damaging his already tarnished brand beyond repair. He’s heartily loathed by many of his Tory colleagues as a remoaner and as George Osborne’s representative on Earth. He is faced with a slowing economy at the bottom of the G7 growth league, dragged down by poor productivity and weak revenue receipts. Continue reading...

    Opinion | The Guardian / 17 h. 35 min. ago more
  • Is May’s political survival more important than the Good Friday agreement? | Michelle O’NeillIs May’s political survival more important than the Good Friday agreement? | Michelle O’Neill

    The prime minister’s rightwing pact with the DUP and the increasing likelihood of a no-deal Brexit have left the people in the north of Ireland staring into an abyss• Michelle O’Neill is leader of Sinn Féin in the Northern Ireland assemblyThe failure to restore the power-sharing administration in Belfast is a direct consequence of the Tory-DUP deal to prop up Theresa May’s government. It is undermining the entire talks process and shattering any remaining pretence of British government impartiality. Related: Westminster imposes budget on Northern Ireland Continue reading...

    Opinion | The Guardian / 17 h. 48 min. ago more
  • We can’t leave new trade deals to buccaneers like Liam Fox | Barry GardinerWe can’t leave new trade deals to buccaneers like Liam Fox | Barry Gardiner

    Plans to allow government to strike agreements without the oversight of MPs are an assault on parliamentary sovereignty. That’s why our campaign is so vital• Barry Gardiner is shadow secretary of state for international trade, energy and climate change. He has been Labour MP for Brent North since 1997Today I will be speaking at the launch of a campaign in the House of Commons that is vital to the future of our country.It is a campaign that is not about Brexit. It is not about our struggling health service or our underfunded schools. It is not about building more houses or reforming social care and yet it is vital for all these things. It is a campaign to save our parliamentary democracy. I will give it my wholehearted support, and I urge you to do so too. Continue reading...

    Opinion | The Guardian / 18 h. 41 min. ago more
  • From flying slacks to shouts of shame: Janet and Justin’s Super Bowl 2018 imaginedFrom flying slacks to shouts of shame: Janet and Justin’s Super Bowl 2018 imagined

    The last time they performed together, it was a disaster. Would it end differently now?After the notorious ‘wardrobe malfunction’ of 2004’s Super Bowl half-time show, Janet Jackson’s career was decimated, while Justin Timberlake walked off whistling. With the latter recently confirmed for 2018’s ceremony, how might a possible reunion between the pop idols work? Related: Justin Timberlake to star at Super Bowl 14 years after 'wardrobe malfunction' Continue reading...

    Culture | The Guardian / 18 h. 41 min. ago more
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  • Humpback dolphins offer gifts in rare courtship ritual – videoHumpback dolphins offer gifts in rare courtship ritual – video

    Humpback dolphins in Western Australia have been observed gifting sea sponges to potential mates in a courtship behaviour that researchers say is very rare.  'It highlights that there's another species out there that's quite socially complex, more than we previously recognised,' says Dr Simon Allen, lead researcher from the University of Western Australia. 'They are thinking animals' Continue reading...

    Environment | The Guardian / 21 h. 15 min. ago more
  • The top 10 gaming trends of 2017The top 10 gaming trends of 2017

    As video gaming tightens its grip on mainstream culture, the games and their themes are becoming broader and bolderGadgets are only as good as their content, and though 2017 has been a difficult year for the world, it’s been a great one for video games. As gaming elbows its way to the centre stage of mainstream culture, the titles and their themes are increasingly reflecting the wide variety of players and their concerns. Here are the best games and consoles, and the most exciting trends of 2017. Continue reading...

    Technology | The Guardian / 21 h. 36 min. ago more
  • Britain has become a zombie state. Philip Hammond cannot save it | Polly ToynbeeBritain has become a zombie state. Philip Hammond cannot save it | Polly Toynbee

    As civil war rages in the cabinet and the chancellor is undermined by Theresa May, he won’t reverse the damage of austerityDriverless cars are the chancellor’s vision. He promised to ride one – but yesterday backed off: someone warned him driverlessness was a bad look on budget eve. If he is trying to mimic Harold Wilson’s 1964 “white heat of technology”, it may not be as popular. Few yet yearn for robots on the roads – certainly not the million professional drivers fearful of joining the unemployed, even if Philip Hammond wrongly claimed on Sunday that the unemployed don’t exist. Related: The ‘no unemployment’ chancellor needs a budget of compassion | Matthew d’Ancona Continue reading...

    Opinion | The Guardian / 21 h. 41 min. ago more
  • The security guards who could change the face of employment in Britain | Aditya ChakraborttyThe security guards who could change the face of employment in Britain | Aditya Chakrabortty

    How does a respectable institution such as the University of London become a place of abuse and humiliation? A legal battle could transform workers’ rightsThe University of London ranks among the grandest and most renowned higher education institutions, and it sports values to match: “that every member of staff is treated with dignity … at work”; “equality of opportunity … in which individuals are treated equitably”; “diversity, social inclusion and respect”.I have been reporting on the university for four years, during which time I have met a fair number of its workers. They include a grandmother, Marta Luna, employed as a cleaner at a Bloomsbury student hall, where the supervisor instructed her and her colleagues to throw their coats and bags in one giant box on the floor. Lunch was eaten in the laundry room. At the end of each shift, she remembered, “it was like a jumble sale”. Picture your grandma, kneeling in front of strangers to reclaim her own handbag. Continue reading...

    Opinion | The Guardian / 21 h. 41 min. ago more
  • Bye bye Batman: should Ben Affleck bow out as the caped crusader?Bye bye Batman: should Ben Affleck bow out as the caped crusader?

    Justice League’s weak box office performance spotlights Affleck’s tricky position – whether to limp on, or join the order of failed dark knightsIf there is a “Batman curse” affecting those who have pulled on the cape and cowl on the big screen, it is not always a lasting one. George Clooney recovered from portraying a detested version of Gotham’s dark knight for Joel Schumacher in 1997’s Batman & Robin to become one of Hollywood’s most celebrated actors and film-makers. Christian Bale is rarely out of the awards season spotlight for long, and Michael Keaton is currently experiencing a gilded career revival that has even seen him return to superhero movies. It would be fair to say, however, that the role can be something of a poisoned chalice. Clooney was perhaps fortunate to recover from the critical drubbing handed to Schumacher’s film (his co-star Chris O’Donnell never really did) and Val Kilmer’s career certainly hit the skids after he took the lead role in 1995’s Batman Forever. Both actors were unfortunate to have been cast as Batman while Warner Bros encouraged Schumacher to indulge his penchant for kitsch and camp as a reaction to Tim Burton’s gothic take on the caped crusader in 1989’s Batman and 1992 sequel Batman Returns. Continue reading...

    Culture | The Guardian / 21 h. 41 min. ago more
  • Would I Lie to You review: it's hilarious – honestlyWould I Lie to You review: it's hilarious – honestly

    The panel show remains razor-sharp in its 11th series, with host Rob Brydon and team captains Lee Mack and David Mitchell a perfect combination. Plus, Storyville: My Mother’s Lost ChildrenAnd here he is again – panel show professional/talent show contestant-for-hire Ed Balls. How come he’s not in the jungle? Maybe they thought he’d been spreading himself too thin and people were already bored of him. He’s making up for it elsewhere – Michael McIntyre’s Big Show at the weekend and now Would I Lie to You? (BBC One).Ed’s former existence is now such a distant memory I’m beginning to wonder if it was all a dream. Can this clown really have once been the shadow chancellor who wanted to be leader of the Labour party and therefore the country? Continue reading...

    Culture | The Guardian / 21 h. 41 min. ago more
  • A little piste of Christmas in the Austrian AlpsA little piste of Christmas in the Austrian Alps

    The high Alpine resort of Katschberg proves perfect for a family of mixed abilities, and December’s lantern-lit advent trail leaves everyone feeling festive I’m zig-zagging slowly down a beginners’ slope trying to avoid the three-year-olds zipping across my path and under the outstretched arms of a giant Mr Man. My two daughters, age 12 and 10, glide along behind me. As we pull to a stop I breathe a sigh of relief. I didn’t fall over that time.“High five,” says Nico, our instructor. My daughters slide into position beside me, nonchalantly touching gloves with him as they do so. I try to reach over to his hand without going bottoms up again. I miss. Continue reading...

    Travel | The Guardian / 21 h. 41 min. ago more
  • How China made Victoria's Secret a pawn in its ruthless global game  | Paul MasonHow China made Victoria's Secret a pawn in its ruthless global game | Paul Mason

    The lingerie brand’s star model Gigi Hadid got into trouble over a gaffe that a more seasoned business traveller to China might have anticipated. So what hope for future forays into this repressive state?As a movie plot, it would work better for Johnny English than James Bond: the lingerie brand Victoria’s Secret saw its launch in China mired in controversy when the People’s Republic refused to issue visas to invited celebrities and journalists. Katy Perry was barred for seemingly supporting the independence of Taiwan, while model Gigi Hadid transgressed by squinting in a way some Chinese people thought was racist, while posing with a fortune cookie that looked like Buddha. Add in China’s standard unpredictability when it comes to issuing press visas and you have loss of face all around.A brief history Continue reading...

    Fashion | The Guardian / 1 d. 8 h. 38 min. ago more
  • Nebraska regulators approve Keystone XL pipeline routeNebraska regulators approve Keystone XL pipeline route

    Pipeline plan clears last major regulatory hurdle after vote in Nebraska, but legal challenges and protest likely to follow A panel of Nebraska regulators have voted narrowly in favor of allowing the Keystone XL pipeline to follow a path through the state, removing the last major regulatory hurdle for the controversial project. The Nebraska public service commission voted 3-2 to approve a permit for the pipeline, which will stretch for 1,200 miles and carry up to 830,000 barrels of oil a day. The vote saw one of the four Republicans on the commission, Mary Ridder, join with the Democrat, Crystal Rhoades, in opposing the permit. Rhoades said she was concerned about the impact upon landowners and that there was “no evidence” the pipeline would create jobs in Nebraska. Continue reading...

    Environment | The Guardian / 1 d. 8 h. 43 min. ago more
  • Charities received record £1.83bn from £1m-plus donors last yearCharities received record £1.83bn from £1m-plus donors last year

    Bill Gates and Warren Buffett’s Giving Pledge has encouraged donations, research by Coutts and University of Kent findsRich people, foundations and companies in the UK donated a record £1.83bn to charities last year, as high profile philanthropy schemes such as Bill Gates and Warren Buffett’s Giving Pledge have encouraged more wealthy individuals to give away a portion of their fortunes. Research by Coutts, the private bank used by the royal family, and researchers at the University of Kent found that 310 UK people and organisations made donations of £1m or more last year. The number of £1m-plus donations increased from 189 in in 2007, when Coutts produced the first edition of the Million Pound Donors report. Continue reading...

    Economy | The Guardian / 1 d. 8 h. 45 min. ago more
  • A ‘festive garbage clam’: the problem with Ivanka Trump’s Thanksgiving centrepieceA ‘festive garbage clam’: the problem with Ivanka Trump’s Thanksgiving centrepiece

    The first daughter’s extreme, but by no means exceptional, example of the form has been widely ridiculed on Twitter. But she won’t be the only one going over the top this year‘Have no idea how to decorate your Thanksgiving table? Problem solved,” read the tweet from Ivanka Trump HQ. But the link to what her website described as a “bold and unexpected Thanksgiving tablescape” looked more like a problem created: a giant clamshell filled with little grey pumpkins, moss, pine cones and driftwood. Welcome to the weird and twisted world of the Thanksgiving centrepiece.Have no idea how to decorate your Thanksgiving table? Problem solved: https://t.co/2ssrjO7yPl pic.twitter.com/f4T1Oqr5c7 Continue reading...

    Lifestyle | The Guardian / 1 d. 10 h. 50 min. ago more
  • Eurotunnel renamed Getlink in preparation for post-Brexit eraEurotunnel renamed Getlink in preparation for post-Brexit era

    Company says rebrand to ‘very Anglo-Saxon’ name is needed because it owns businesses beyond the Channel TunnelEurotunnel is preparing for the post-Brexit era with a corporate rebrand, with the company being renamed Getlink.The French company, which operates the Channel Tunnel, has chosen the admirably Anglo-Saxon name to “mark the group’s passage into an exciting new era for mobility infrastructures”. Continue reading...

    Economy | The Guardian / 1 d. 11 h. 2 min. ago more
  • The healthcare gender bias: do men get better medical treatment?The healthcare gender bias: do men get better medical treatment?

    A study this month found that women are less likely than men to be given CPR – but it is not the only way in which they are given short shrift in an industry where female pain is serially misdiagnosedYou are walking down the street, minding your own business, when suddenly you see someone collapse to the ground. They are unresponsive, not breathing. Do you perform CPR? No doubt you like to think that you would. But what if the unlucky person was a woman? The question may seem redundant, but unfortunately it is not: a study this month found that women are less likely than men to get CPR from a bystander, and are more likely to die.The research, funded by the American Heart Association and the National Institutes of Health, found that only 39% of women who have a cardiac arrest in a public place were given CPR, versus 45% of men. Men were 23% more likely to survive and one of the study leaders, Benjamin Abella, speculated that rescuers may worry about moving a woman’s clothing, or touching her breasts. One idea mooted was more realistic-looking practice mannequins to account for the female torso. Continue reading...

    Lifestyle | The Guardian / 1 d. 11 h. 7 min. ago more
  • Kitchen consequential: how hazardous is your cooking space?Kitchen consequential: how hazardous is your cooking space?

    Cooks may be unwittingly inhaling dangerous microscopic oil droplets while using frying pans – but how does the health risk compare with other hazards in our kitchen?No one needs reminding of the benefits of good cooking, but how often have you paused among your appliances to consider the stark and various dangers lurking on and beneath our work surfaces?The latest kitchen nightmare to reckon with: cooking oil. Not the oil that clogs our arteries and gives us heart attacks in our 40s, or the oil that ignites in chip pans and burns the house down, but rather the stuff that explodes invisibly and enters our lungs. Continue reading...

    Lifestyle | The Guardian / 1 d. 11 h. 15 min. ago more
  • Tantrums over tiaras … how to navigate the latest gender minefieldTantrums over tiaras … how to navigate the latest gender minefield

    There’s a tabloid hysteria about what kids shouldn’t wear. Here’s a thought, says our style expert, in her weekly column: maybe we shouldn’t screw up our children any more than necessary with antiquated stereotypesThere seems to be a national moral panic about what little children wear. Wait, what?Tamara, London Continue reading...

    Fashion | The Guardian / 1 d. 11 h. 24 min. ago
  • The king of cling: Azzedine Alaïa's best looks – in picturesThe king of cling: Azzedine Alaïa's best looks – in pictures

    The Tunisian-born fashion designer Azzedine Alaïa, who died on Friday, dressed everyone from Grace Jones and Naomi Campbell to all of French high society Continue reading...

    Fashion | The Guardian / 1 d. 11 h. 41 min. ago
  • Uber plans to buy 24,000 autonomous Volvo SUVs in self-driving pushUber plans to buy 24,000 autonomous Volvo SUVs in self-driving push

    ‘It only becomes a commercial business when you can remove the vehicle operator from the equation,’ says ride-hailing firm battling Lyft and WaymoUber is planning to buy up to 24,000 self-driving cars from Volvo, the company has announced, moving from its current model of ride-sharing using freelance drivers to owning a fleet of autonomous cars.Following the three-year self-driving partnership with Volvo, the non-binding framework could give Uber a boost in its ambitions to perfect self-driving systems to replace human drivers, following setbacks and lawsuits over trade secrets and talent. Continue reading...

    Technology | The Guardian / 1 d. 11 h. 47 min. ago more
  • How to repair our environment, one species at a time | Patrick BarkhamHow to repair our environment, one species at a time | Patrick Barkham

    Bringing back rare beetles and butterflies might sound self-indulgent, but it proves that individuals can make an impactThe swelteringly hot summer of 1976 was the last gasp for the chequered skipper, a dynamic little butterfly that once buzzed along the rides of the ancient royal hunting forest of Rockingham in Northamptonshire. Related: Funding boost to help save England's rarest species from extinction Continue reading...

    Environment | The Guardian / 1 d. 11 h. 51 min. ago more
  • Blue Planet II: what have we learned so far?Blue Planet II: what have we learned so far?

    The documentary’s marvels are not just new to television – many are new to science as well. From hyper-intelligent fish to the origin of life itself, we round up the series’s biggest discoveries It is testament to the number of spectacles packed into Blue Planet II that the strategic change of gender a giant wrasse is – scientifically speaking, at least – one of the least remarkable. Changing gender, or sequential hermaphroditism, is a fact of life for more than 400 species of fish, and has already been widely studied. But many of the programme’s marvels are new not just to television but to science itself. Some have only been published within the past half-decade; others existed only anecdotally until now. Here we track some of the most astonishing findings of the series so far – to be updated after each new episode. Continue reading...

    Environment | The Guardian / 1 d. 11 h. 52 min. ago more
  • Dramatic victory: are we entering a golden age for the sports documentary?Dramatic victory: are we entering a golden age for the sports documentary?

    Sport’s screen outings have long been blighted by timidity but two new films, 89 and Kenny, tell stirring stories with style and swagger. And there’s more to comeIt seems fair to say sports documentary films reached something of an early artistic end-point with 1971’s Football As Never Before, a feature-length George Best portrait by the West German arthouse director Hellmuth Costard – best known for his 1968 work Especially Valuable, which featured a talking penis quoting passages of government legislation.Presented without voiceover or soundtrack, Football As Never Before is an hour and 45 minutes of a single camera following its star around the pitch during a Manchester United game against Coventry City. Whatever its ultimate merits – and FANB does provide an absolute gold standard in mesmeric closeup shots focused, for long periods, entirely on George Best’s buttocks – the film also speaks to a more basic confusion over what exactly to do with sport on camera. Continue reading...

    Culture | The Guardian / 1 d. 12 h. 27 min. ago more
  • E-bikes: time to saddle up with low-cost energy and no sweat?E-bikes: time to saddle up with low-cost energy and no sweat?

    E-bikes are well-established in some EU countries, but how about the UK? Old-school cyclist Peter Kimpton tries a new model to see if he’d be tempted to swap“E-bikes are fantastic. I use them all the time. You can take the kids up mountains. You can arrive in your good clothes at a meeting. It’s so easy.” Who said this? Surprisingly, it was none other than Fabian Cancellara, perhaps the greatest ever road time-trial rider. He made similar remarks during a Q&A at the recent Rouleur Classic, an event for road bike and race purists, causing good-humoured outrage. But if even the great Cancellara can ride an e-bike, so will I. Continue reading...

    Environment | The Guardian / 1 d. 13 h. 36 min. ago more
  • OnePlus 5T review: premium full-screen experience at half cost of iPhone XOnePlus 5T review: premium full-screen experience at half cost of iPhone X

    OnePlus has done it again, producing a smartphone with almost its rivals’ high-end features, including 36-hour battery life, at an affordable priceThe OnePlus 5T propels the Chinese company into the brave new era of full-screen smartphones, with a new 6in minimal bezel display squeezed into the body of a 5.5in device.The 5T is OnePlus’s fourth phone in two years. Unlike the OnePlus 3 to 3T upgrade in 2016, the internal components for the 5T have mostly stayed the same as those of the OnePlus 5, with the screen and camera the biggest differences. Continue reading...

    Technology | The Guardian / 1 d. 13 h. 42 min. ago more
  • Constipation killed Elvis – here’s how to avoid his fate | Michele HansonConstipation killed Elvis – here’s how to avoid his fate | Michele Hanson

    It is no fun to feel clogged up with cement – and, as history teaches us, it can be fatal. But we need to learn to talk about itMy friend has frightful constipation. I’ll call her X because she’s embarrassed by it. She staggered to the chemist and asked to speak to the pharmacist. “You can tell me what’s wrong,” said the assistant. “He’s out the back. I’ll tell him.”“Constipation,” whispered my friend. Continue reading...

    Lifestyle | The Guardian / 1 d. 14 h. 13 min. ago more
  • Beer goggles? Gordon Ramsay under fire over Korean TV advertBeer goggles? Gordon Ramsay under fire over Korean TV advert

    ‘Bloody fresh,’ said the chef as he downed a glass of Cass, but critics say he is endorsing ‘maybe the worst beer in the world’Gordon Ramsay routinely berates contestants – often in the most colourful terms – on his television shows for their poor sense of taste.But this week it is the celebrity chef’s own tastebuds that are being called into question after he appeared in a TV advert promoting a South Korean beer that can politely be described as bland. Continue reading...

    Lifestyle | The Guardian / 1 d. 15 h. 1 min. ago more
  • A civil rights 'emergency': justice, clean air and water in the age of TrumpA civil rights 'emergency': justice, clean air and water in the age of Trump

    The Trump administration is peeling away rules designed to protect clean air and water, fueling a growing urgency around the struggle for environmental justice, say political leaders, academics and activists The Trump administration’s dismantling of environmental regulations has intensified a growing civil rights battle over the deadly burden of pollution on minorities and low-income people.Black, Latino and disadvantaged people have long been disproportionately afflicted by toxins from industrial plants, cars, hazardous housing conditions and other sources. Continue reading...

    Environment | The Guardian / 1 d. 15 h. 42 min. ago more
  • Five of the best distilleries on the American Whiskey TrailFive of the best distilleries on the American Whiskey Trail

    As sales of Kentucky bourbon and Tennessee whiskey have rocketed, so has interest in the terroir of the region, and distilleries – Jack Daniel’s and Wild Turkey included – have opened for toursUS whiskey has experienced dramatic growth over the last decade, propelled by an unslakable thirst for it from Europe, China and India. But while the spirits themselves – mostly bourbon, Tennessee whiskey and rye – have gained distinction worldwide, their places of origin remain somewhat mysterious. This has a lot to do with their terroirs, Kentucky and Tennessee – two southern states that are low on the destination list for many visiting Europeans. The fact that some counties in these states are dry and until recently wouldn’t allow their distilleries to offer tastings, has further complicated matters. Continue reading...

    Travel | The Guardian / 1 d. 16 h. 42 min. ago more
  • Is eating too quickly bad for your health?Is eating too quickly bad for your health?

    Gulping down breakfast or lunch has long been thought unhealthy, but is there any evidence that eating your food too fast causes real harm?Do you savour mealtimes or do you wolf your food down? Eating at your desk or on the run can mean you can gulp down your breakfast or lunch in less than five minutes. And this means you are more likely to get obese or develop metabolic syndrome, both of which increase your risk of heart disease, diabetes and stroke, says research presented at last week’s American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017.The researchers from Hiroshima University in Japan followed up 642 men and 441 women over five years, identifying them as either slow, normal or fast eaters. They found that fast eaters were 11.6% more likely to have developed metabolic syndrome – defined as having any of three risk factors out of obesity (around the waistline), high blood pressure, high levels of bad fats (triglycerides) and high blood sugar after a period of fasting. Continue reading...

    Lifestyle | The Guardian / 1 d. 19 h. 42 min. ago more
  • I’m into fetish but fear confessing that I’ve been faking my orgasmsI’m into fetish but fear confessing that I’ve been faking my orgasms

    My boyfriend and I are highly compatible sexually, but I feel awful for lying to him for so long. Should I risk losing his trust by being honest?I am in a very happy relationship with my boyfriend of nine months. Sexually, we are highly compatible and we have explored my interest in fetish and being tied up. But, stupidly, I faked orgasms from the start, as I feel I take so long to climax and was too embarrassed to be honest with him. I feel awful for lying. Do I confess and risk our trust or take another approach?The latter would be safer. Some partners feel very betrayed by such a confession, and the likely ensuing loss of confidence would not enhance your chances of having more orgasms with him. Relax – you’re far from being alone in faking and feeling guilty about it. And your fault is really your anxiety and desire to be accommodating. So instead of making a risky confession, move on and try positive reinforcement. This involves giving really clear rewards when he does anything that is likely to bring you to orgasm. Using your creativity, suggest mutually exciting sex play in which there is more of the exact type of direct clitoral stimulation that’s a faster track to climaxing for you. The fact that you are both open to experimentation should make this fairly easy. Many people appreciate and enjoy being gently guided by their partner, so be brave enough to try new techniques – and show him exactly what you want him to do. Continue reading...

    Lifestyle | The Guardian / 1 d. 20 h. 42 min. ago more
  • Reduce, reuse, reboot: why electronic recycling must up its gameReduce, reuse, reboot: why electronic recycling must up its game

    With global e-waste projected to hit 50m tonnes next year, consumers need to put pressure on technology firms to make their products more repairableTech powers many things, including cognitive dissonance. A few years ago I was travelling through Agbogbloshie, the commercial district in Accra, known as a graveyard for electronic waste, a hotspot for digital dumping. I tutted and shook my head in sorrow as I surveyed the charred keyboards and plumes of toxic computer smoke wafting across the landscape. My Ghanaian colleague looked with some amusement at the tech spilling out of my handbag. My laptop, phone, iPad – where did I think they might end up?Despite my relatively puritanical approach to upgrades (I can remember ALL my phones), there’s a good chance that those items ended up back there or somewhere similar. According to 2011 figures from the B&FT (Business and Financial Times, Ghana’s biggest business newspaper), the country took in 17,765 tonnes of UK e-waste that year, nearly 50% of all of the waste electronics that were dumped there. For the UK’s discarded electronic goods, Ghana is still likely to be a major destination. Others include China, India and Nigeria. Out of all the electronic waste we send for recycling, 80% ends up being shipped (some legally, and some not) to emerging and developing countries. China is tightening up. A recent change in the law reclassified circuit boards as “hazardous” waste, putting some Chinese e-waste reprocessors out of business. It was a digital version of the butterfly effect: causing more e-waste to be dumped on developing countries to be processed illegally. Continue reading...

    Environment | The Guardian / 1 d. 21 h. 37 min. ago more
  • How virtual reality is taking dementia patients back to the futureHow virtual reality is taking dementia patients back to the future

    The Wayback project recreates coronation day in 1953 on 3D film using actors, period costumes and props, right down to fish-paste sandwiches. The effect is to bring back vivid memories for those struggling with the presentIn a comfortable armchair, glass of sherry at her side, Elspeth Ford is getting to grips with her 3D goggles. “Maybe I’ll go another other way now,” she says, looking left, right, up, down. She breaks into a cheery rendition of the Lambeth Walk.Elspeth, 79, is a resident at Langham Court, a dementia care home in Surrey, and today she is trialling a virtual reality project, Wayback, that has been designed especially for those living with dementia. Peering into her headset, Elspeth is temporarily transported to 2 June 1953, and a street party for the Queen’s coronation. She is enjoying a children’s fancy-dress competition. “I love that boy dressed as an Oxo cube,” she laughs. Continue reading...

    Lifestyle | The Guardian / 1 d. 21 h. 42 min. ago more
  • Chhattisgarh: the heart of rural IndiaChhattisgarh: the heart of rural India

    Kate Eshelby and family enjoy the pristine lands and age-old ways of the people of Chhattisgarh stateThree men in huge straw hats covered in peacock feathers and tinsel are playing wooden flutes as they herd cows and water buffalo on the edge of the jungle. Even the animals sport necklaces of bright flowers. This is Chhattisgarh state, in east-central India: little visited, yet rewarding, it’s a land of elusive leopards, tigers and animist beliefs that gained independence from neighbouring Madhya Pradesh in 2000. I’m here with my husband Mark and our two boys, aged four and two. This may sound an unusual choice for a family holiday but Chhattisgarh works, because it’s quiet and rural and free of India’s city chaos. Continue reading...

    Travel | The Guardian / 1 d. 21 h. 42 min. ago more
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  • UK trade minister lobbied Brazil on behalf of oil giantsUK trade minister lobbied Brazil on behalf of oil giants

    A telegram obtained by Greenpeace shows that Greg Hands met a Brazilian minister to discuss relaxation of tax and environmental regulationBritain successfully lobbied Brazil on behalf of BP and Shell to address the oil giants’ concerns over Brazilian taxation, environmental regulation and rules on using local firms, government documents reveal.The UK’s trade minister travelled to Rio de Janeiro, Belo Horizonte and São Paulo in March for a visit with a “heavy focus” on hydrocarbons, to help British energy, mining and water companies win business in Brazil. Continue reading...

    Environment | The Guardian / 2 d. 11 h. 3 min. ago more
  • How was your weekend running?How was your weekend running?

    Racing, pacing, mudlarking or recovering - as always, come and share your weekend stories below the lineAny race with a beer in the pre-race goody bag, and a bag of oranges presented as you cross the line, already has me in the palm of its hand. Add in sunshine, perfect temperatures for running, palm trees, wide, flat roads and you have an official contender for my favourite 10k ever. I’ve spent the weekend in Valencia, eating oranges, running that 10k and cheering on the marathoners on the same course (my race route was essentially the last 10k of the marathon). The start/finish area is one of the most picturesque I’ve ever seen, and I swear I have actually felt my Vitamin D levels rising in the Spanish November sun.I confess I’ve been struggling recently with motivation - not so much with track or hill sessions. Broken into small reps, and too little breath or oxygen to the brain to really have any thoughts - negative or otherwise - I can always get those done. It’s more the so-called easy runs: I just haven’t found myself either looking forward to, or enjoying, one of those in ages. Continue reading...

    Lifestyle | The Guardian / 2 d. 11 h. 18 min. ago more
  • Are pop-up igloos the new Christmas markets?Are pop-up igloos the new Christmas markets?

    Pop-up snowglobes are appearing on roof terraces, and in back gardens and holiday resorts – with Instagram feeds set to be filled with #igloo pics all winter The only place to be seen during the winter months – and you will be, thanks to their transparency – is in an igloo. The domed structures are popping up like PVC pustules all over terraces and rooftop bars in the capital and elsewhere. They’re being called “igloos” but they have little in common with Inuit structures – the culture being appropriated here is more Eden Project. Will they go the way of the Christmas market, which after nearly two decades has now become a winter fixture? Continue reading...

    Lifestyle | The Guardian / 2 d. 13 h. 42 min. ago more
  • Sri Lanka's perfect, crispy-edged snack – AppamSri Lanka's perfect, crispy-edged snack – Appam

    These cup-shaped pancakes are an obsession in Sri Lanka and the no-menu street cafes of Colombo do it bestAppam, or “hoppers” in English, are cup-shaped rice-flour pancakes. They are eaten most commonly for breakfast and dinner, which, in Sri Lanka, are the smaller meals of the day – so don’t go looking for them for lunch. Sri Lanka doesn’t have a big street food scene – the traditional food of rice and curries isn’t really an “on the go” dish – but appam are the exception: they are sold at stalls (sometimes as part of a restaurant) with chicken curry (more gravy than meat) and coconut sambal.The perfect appam is light and fluffy in the middle and crispy at the edges. Traditionally the batter is made with ground rice, coconut milk, sugar, salt, and yeast or toddy, and left to ferment overnight. The trick is the pan: the batter needs to be fairly thin to get the crispy edge, so if your pan isn’t seasoned and oiled properly, you can’t get the appam out at the end. Opinions vary about the best oil to use: gingelly oil (sesame) is traditional, but in Sri Lanka it’s expensive, so coconut or vegetable oils are common substitutes. Barely “wet” the pan with an oil-soaked rag, and you’ll know you’ve done it right when all you need to do is tilt the pan and the appam slides out. Continue reading...

    Travel | The Guardian / 2 d. 17 h. 42 min. ago more
  • Unlucky or deluded? One man’s attempt to swim the AtlanticUnlucky or deluded? One man’s attempt to swim the Atlantic

    Ben Hooper’s plan to swim 2,000 miles from Senegal to Brazil – complete with sharks, storms and deadly jellyfish – didn’t work out. Alex Moshakis meets him to find out whyOne sunny morning last November, Ben Hooper, a 38-year-old former policeman, waded into the Atlantic Ocean from a beach in Dakar, Senegal, and plunged right in. In film of the moment, Hooper appears thick set, almost podgy. He’d spent the past year bulking up and now layers of fat concealed muscle beneath. He wore a sports watch, black goggles provided by a sponsor and a pair of tight blue shorts. The sun had risen early, and by 10.33am, when Hooper entered the water, the ocean temperature had reached 30C, a lukewarm bath. A group of reporters gawked from the shallows. Most of them squinted in the bright light.Hooper had been in Dakar for six weeks, preparing to swim to Natal, northeast Brazil, 1,879 miles away. If successful, he would become the first person to swim across the Atlantic Ocean – 12 miles a day for over 140 days straight – an unfathomable feat. As he swam away from the beach, Hooper began to feel tears in his eyes. A mile later he “cried like a baby”. The launch represented the culmination of three years’ planning, and the relief was overwhelming. Later that day, as the adrenaline wore off and the magnitude of the task began to sink in, he swam against currents that made it difficult to achieve significant mileage. Later, while he recovered on the support boat, a 37-year-old catamaran, he wrote the first in a series of blog posts he’d publish during the attempt. “Spent the night drifting under sea anchor,” it read, “4.5 miles closer to making history.” Continue reading...

    Lifestyle | The Guardian / 2 d. 18 h. 42 min. ago more
  • The art of broken hearts: smashed mannequin to a bottled wedding dressThe art of broken hearts: smashed mannequin to a bottled wedding dress

    When a couple splits, there are always objects resonant with the love that’s been lost. But what should you do with the stuff? How about submitting it to the Museum of Broken Relationships…What can one do with the frail ruins of a love affair?” asks Olinka Vištica, curator of the Museum of Broken Relationships – an idea that began 12 years ago when her own union, with co-curator Dražen Grubišić, was breaking up. “The physical remains of our four years together gawked at us from every corner of the house,” she says, “a dusty computer with photographs of happier times, books inscribed with failed promises… Where would it all end up?” And so their plan for an ever-evolving collection donated by the world’s broken hearted was born.At first, their museum started as an installation at a local arts festival. Exhibitions in Berlin, San Francisco, Ljubljana and Singapore soon followed, and the debris of love lost and hearts shattered, was sent to them from around the world. “I have lost count of how many parcels stamped in Europe, India, China, Austrlia, or the US, we have personally opened.” Continue reading...

    Lifestyle | The Guardian / 2 d. 20 h. 41 min. ago more
  • As Norway sells out of oil, suddenly fossil fuels are starting to look riskyAs Norway sells out of oil, suddenly fossil fuels are starting to look risky

    Experts are not predicting the end of drilling quite yet: but the decision in Oslo has sharpened the debate over the future profitability of the industryDespite the rise of electric cars and stronger action on climate change, it’s still too early to write the obituary of oil. That was the verdict last week of one of the world’s leading energy experts, economist Dr Fatih Birol.The International Energy Agency, which he leads, is expecting growth in appetite for oil to slow over the next two decades, but doesn’t see demand peaking this side of 2040 because the fuel will still be needed for trucks, ships, aviation and petrochemicals. Continue reading...

    Environment | The Guardian / 2 d. 20 h. 41 min. ago more
  • Naked attraction: art and tragic tales in Modigliani’s ParisNaked attraction: art and tragic tales in Modigliani’s Paris

    As Tate Modern prepares a new exhibition of his work, including 12 of his famous nudes, Louise Roddon explores the artist’s haunts in Montmartre and MontparnassePoor Amedeo Modigliani, what a tough life he led. I’m thinking this as I climb the steps to his last studio in Montparnasse. It’s a classic artist’s garret with peeling paint and poor lighting, and climbing the countless floors on a narrow stone tread, leaves me winded. It wouldn’t have been easy for a man with advanced tuberculosis. With Tate Modern about to stage its Modigliani exhibition, I’ve come to number 8 Rue de la Grande-Chaumière, his final home before he died tragically young in 1920. At 35, he wasn’t just a victim of TB, but was suffering the toll of a lifetime’s enthusiasm for alcohol and drugs. Continue reading...

    Travel | The Guardian / 2 d. 20 h. 41 min. ago more
  • The 40 best gadgets of 2017The 40 best gadgets of 2017

    From smart-speakers and virtual bikes to robot vacuums and indestructible cables, here is the year’s most covetable technology You can assemble one of three robots with this Lego-like kit, each fully mobile and equipped with an infra-red sensor to help it detect and interact with its environment. Best of all, it can then be programmed using the child-friendly block-programming app, opening limitless opportunities. Continue reading...

    Technology | The Guardian / 2 d. 21 h. 11 min. ago more
  • My husband has sex with me, but never says I look nice | Dear MariellaMy husband has sex with me, but never says I look nice | Dear Mariella

    A woman whose husband no longer compliments her says it’s getting her down. Mariella Frostrup suggests she initiates change herself The dilemma My husband and I have been together for just over 10 years, and have a young child. He’s a kind, intelligent person and a loving father and husband. He used to compliment me quite often up until a few years ago, when we began fertility treatment in order to have our child. That was a stressful time and it involved some serious and painful medical issues for me. I also had to face an emergency c-section, which I found traumatic. My husband and I have regular sex, which he usually instigates and I think in his mind this is all he needs to do to show he is still attracted to me. But I feel less and less like having sex because of this. He never says I look nice or compliments me any more. I’ve told him I would really appreciate it if he would, but it doesn’t sink in. Continue reading...

    Lifestyle | The Guardian / 2 d. 21 h. 41 min. ago more
  • Two-tone lipstickTwo-tone lipstick

    Mix fiery orange and cherry red for a welcome flash of winter colourIt’s a SAD lamp in lipstick form. At Jason Wu models wore a fiery orange matte on the top lip and a bombastic cherry red gloss on the bottom. You press it on with your fingers to avoid looking too done. This two-tone look, rather than wacky, is surprisingly wearable – poppy and bold rather than cartoonish – and a welcome flash of colour against the falling of dusk at 4pm.Triple Tone Lipstick £17.50 smashbox.co.uk Benefit They’re Real! Double The Lip £10.50 johnlewis.com Christian Louboutin Silky Satin Lip Colour £70 selfridges.com Topshop Lips in Rio Rio £8 topshop.com Ciaté Liquid Velvet £17 asos.com Make Up Forever Artist Rouge Light £18 debenhams.com Continue reading...

    Fashion | The Guardian / 2 d. 21 h. 41 min. ago more
  • Reasons to wear... CorduroyReasons to wear... Corduroy

    Prada kicked off the corduroy revival with a 70s-inspired collection. The bomber jacket was the standout piece. Get the look with Mango’s organic cotton version Continue reading...

    Fashion | The Guardian / 3 d. 3 h. 47 min. ago
  • Guide to patterned jumpers: the wish list – in picturesGuide to patterned jumpers: the wish list – in pictures

    Jumpers really shine this winter. Check out the hot pink polo shirt knitted with parrots and embellished with sparkling crystal cats by Miu Miu. There’s alpaca spun wool at Isabel Marant Étoile, crochet detailing at JW Anderson and patchwork at Stella McCartney Continue reading...

    Fashion | The Guardian / 3 d. 3 h. 52 min. ago
  • Making light work: grand designs at Bodø's Stormen library and cultural centreMaking light work: grand designs at Bodø's Stormen library and cultural centre

    This Norwegian town, hastily rebuilt after second world war bombing, now has a vibrant and innovative arts centre in pride of place on its waterfrontOn the waterfront in the coastal town of Bodø, Norway, just north of the Arctic Circle, the £110m Stormen (storm) library and cultural centre stands out against the bland surrounding buildings. Designed by London-based DRDH Architects, the modern cluster of cubist buildings have white concrete surfaces varying from matte to polished, and long windows that flood the interior with light. Much of the town was destroyed in a Luftwaffe attack in May 1940 but the rapidly built prefabricated homes and public buildings are now slowly being replaced by more permanent structures and Stormen, opened in 2014, takes pride of place. Continue reading...

    Travel | The Guardian / 3 d. 17 h. 42 min. ago more
  • I’ve seen how exclusive the fashion world is. Can the new Vogue change that? | Hadley FreemanI’ve seen how exclusive the fashion world is. Can the new Vogue change that? | Hadley Freeman

    I covered the fashion shows for almost a decade, where I could count the number of black women in the front row on one fingerWhen I was 22 I got my dream job offer: to work as an assistant at a major American fashion magazine. I was going to be independent and, I sang to myself, working with the most creative people in the world. And then I met my prospective boss.“So your annual salary will be $17,000 (£13,000),” she said breezily. The average salary in New York at that point was just under $50,000 (£38,000). Continue reading...

    Fashion | The Guardian / 3 d. 18 h. 43 min. ago more
  • The best balm cleansers | Sali HughesThe best balm cleansers | Sali Hughes

    I believe the single most noticeably skin-improving treatment is to massage a balm cleanser into the face to loosen dirt and makeupI have been devoted to the hot-cloth cleansing method for more than two decades, and my mission to convert others continues. I believe the single most noticeably skin-improving treatment is to massage a balm cleanser into the face to loosen dirt and makeup, then buff off with a hand-hot, wrung-out, common-or-garden terry cotton flannel until spotlessly clean. A reluctance to get on board usually lies with a psychological need for suds and foam – understandable, if you’re naturally overburdened with oil and find balms leave your face with a tacky residue. But you can have the best of both worlds, I promise. Membership Event: Guardian Weekend Live Continue reading...

    Fashion | The Guardian / 3 d. 19 h. 42 min. ago more
  • 10 of the best Christmas shopping cities in Europe10 of the best Christmas shopping cities in Europe

    Put some sparkle into your festive shopping with our guide to the best boutiques, gift stores and markets in Europe• Plus where to eat, drink and drop after you shop Continue reading...

    Travel | The Guardian / 3 d. 20 h. 42 min. ago
  • Nasa map of Earth's seasons over 20 years highlights climate changeNasa map of Earth's seasons over 20 years highlights climate change

    The visualization shows spring coming earlier and the Arctic ice caps receding over time Nasa has captured 20 years of changing seasons in a striking new global map of planet Earth​.The data visualization, released this week, shows Earth’s fluctuations as seen from space. Continue reading...

    Environment | The Guardian / 4 d. 0 h. 30 min. ago
  • Germany bans children's 'smart' watches over surveillance concernsGermany bans children's 'smart' watches over surveillance concerns

    Telecoms regulator urges parents to destroy the devices, which have been used to listen in on classroom lessonsGermany’s telecoms regulator has banned ​the sale of “smart watches” that can be used by parents to check on their children, saying the devices violated Germany’s strict surveillance laws. The Federal Network Agency said it had already taken action against several firms that sell the watches online but did not name them. Continue reading...

    Technology | The Guardian / 4 d. 2 h. 7 min. ago more
  • ‘Planet at a crossroads’: climate summit makes progress but leaves much to do‘Planet at a crossroads’: climate summit makes progress but leaves much to do

    The UN negotiations in Bonn lay the groundwork for implementing the landmark Paris deal, but tough decisions lay aheadThe world’s nations were confident they were making important progress in turning continued political commitment into real world action, as the global climate change summit in Bonn was drawing to a close on Friday.The UN talks were tasked with the vital, if unglamorous, task of converting the unprecedented global agreement sealed in Paris in 2015 from a symbolic moment into a set of rules by which nations can combine to defeat global warming. Currently, the world is on track for at least 3C of global warming – a catastrophic outcome that would lead to severe impacts around the world. Continue reading...

    Environment | The Guardian / 4 d. 10 h. 48 min. ago more
  • Bitcoin breaks $8,000 barrier amid speculation over spin-offBitcoin breaks $8,000 barrier amid speculation over spin-off

    One unit of the cryptocurrency now valued at more than six times an ounce of gold, after tenfold rise since start of 2017The price of the virtual currency bitcoin has broken the $8,000 barrier for the first time, prompting speculation that it could soar past $10,000 by the end of the year.The rise means one unit of the world’s first major cryptocurrency is now valued at more than six times an ounce of gold, traditionally seen as a safe-haven investment in times of economic turmoil. Continue reading...

    Technology | The Guardian / 4 d. 10 h. 57 min. ago more
  • What I wore this week: white boots | Jess Cartner-MorleyWhat I wore this week: white boots | Jess Cartner-Morley

    Breaking out of a black shoe rut is an instant moderniserWhite shoes. So practical, in a British winter! Said no one, ever. And yet, a pair of white boots is probably the sensible fashion purchase of the moment. This is the refresh button your look needs, a one-retail-hit wonder to give your new-season wardrobe a kick. They don’t have to be high-heeled, or expensive. Although you will need to get nimble around puddles. Related: What I wore this week: silver | Jess Cartner-Morley Continue reading...

    Fashion | The Guardian / 4 d. 14 h. 42 min. ago more
  • From Cézanne to moths: this week’s fashion trendsFrom Cézanne to moths: this week’s fashion trends

    What’s hot and what’s not in fashion this weekThe E Leoty ‘Corset’ sports bra Inspired by the Paris Ballet corsetry archives and sexier than proper bras. Exercise is the new erotica. Continue reading...

    Fashion | The Guardian / 4 d. 15 h. 42 min. ago
  • Tesla Roadster: nine things we know about the 'smackdown to gasoline cars'Tesla Roadster: nine things we know about the 'smackdown to gasoline cars'

    New electric supercar will break records according to Elon Musk, with blistering acceleration and 630-mile range. Here’s everything we knowTesla announced a new version of its very first car, the Roadster, turning it into an electric supercar described as a “hardcore smackdown to gasoline cars” by company founder Elon Musk.The new sports car was unveiled alongside Tesla’s new electric truck, and promises to wow drivers with some extraordinary statistics that make it look like a Top Trumps card turned into an electrified reality. Continue reading...

    Technology | The Guardian / 4 d. 16 h. 30 min. ago more
  • Eataly World opens but leaves a bad taste in BolognaEataly World opens but leaves a bad taste in Bologna

    It’s the world’s biggest food park with over a kilometre of shops, big brands, even farm animals. But is Eataly World a betrayal of Italian gastronomy?Italy’s “City of Food” has a new attraction. After wandering the alleyways of Bologna’s Mercato di Mezzo – which is filled with local, family-owned grocers such as the well-known Atti & Figli bakery, or Tamburini of tortellini fame – visitors can now take a 20-minute shuttle bus from outside the central station to Fico Eataly World, where food from all over Italy is on show.Inaugurated by prime minister Paolo Gentiloni on 15 November, Eataly World claims to be the world’s largest agri-food park, and promises visitors “a discovery of all the wonders of Italian biodiversity” under one vast, 100,000 sq m roof. However, many are struggling to make sense of a project that stands in direct contrast to the traditional allure of Italian gastronomy – the pleasure of meandering the farmers’ markets in Renaissance town squares, or sampling the delights of small producers in remote hilltop towns. Continue reading...

    Travel | The Guardian / 4 d. 17 h. 23 min. ago more
  • Razzle-dazzle them: the best Christmas party looks for all ages – in picturesRazzle-dazzle them: the best Christmas party looks for all ages – in pictures

    Want to be a sensation this festive season? Then take inspiration from our All Ages team • Jess Cartner-Morley’s Christmas party style rules Continue reading...

    Fashion | The Guardian / 4 d. 19 h. 42 min. ago
  • A mission for journalism in a time of crisisA mission for journalism in a time of crisis

    In a turbulent era, the media must define its values and principles, writes Guardian editor-in-chief Katharine Viner‘No former period, in the history of our Country, has been marked by the agitation of questions of a more important character than those which are now claiming the attention of the public.” So began the announcement, nearly 200 years ago, of a brand-new newspaper to be published in Manchester, England, which proclaimed that “the spirited discussion of political questions” and “the accurate detail of facts” were “particularly important at this juncture”.Now we are living through another extraordinary period in history: one defined by dazzling political shocks and the disruptive impact of new technologies in every part of our lives. The public sphere has changed more radically in the past two decades than in the previous two centuries – and news organisations, including this one, have worked hard to adjust. Continue reading...

    The Guardian / 5 d. 8 h. 42 min. ago more
  • Cafe culture in Buenos Aires – in picturesCafe culture in Buenos Aires – in pictures

    In our weekly look at people’s travel through three of their Instagram shots, Vicky Martínez beautifully captures the timeless atmosphere of the Argentinian capital’s cafe scene Continue reading...

    Travel | The Guardian / 6 d. 13 h. 42 min. ago
  • The alt city guide to YorkThe alt city guide to York

    It’s time for the Romans and Vikings to make way for a new insurgency in the North Yorkshire jewel: a sparky, creative scene fuelled by innovative music, food and drink outletsWhat images come to mind when you think of York? The Minster, steam engines, Romans and Vikings, a city resisting the 21st century? But look beyond that twee facade, outside York’s narrow medieval streets, and a very different city is asserting itself.“It’s definitely getting more vibrant,” says Danielle Barge, editor of webzine Arts York. “In recent years, a lot of people have started independent projects: small theatre and film companies, artists’ studios, music promoters. People are almost in artistic rebellion. They’re taking it upon themselves to say, ‘if no one else is going to make it, we will’.” Continue reading...

    Travel | The Guardian / 6 d. 20 h. 2 min. ago more
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  • 'I feel like I'm in a different time': Thames Lido review'I feel like I'm in a different time': Thames Lido review

    Unused since its closure in 1974, the pool has been restored and refurbished to a quirky and glamorous degreeIn the late 19th and early 20th centuries, swimming was a spectator sport. Onlookers lined the edges of municipal swimming baths to watch feats of endurance swimming, “underwater ballets”, and to marvel at high dives. Celebrities such as Captain Matthew Webb, fresh from conquering the English Channel, and Annette Kellermann, later dubbed the Million Dollar Mermaid, thrilled the crowds.Step forward in time to 2017 and my visit to Thames Lido. I am here in a beautifully refurbished Edwardian swimming pool, swimming up and down what is effectively a glass box, as people sit eating their breakfast behind a vast glass wall. I splash around in front of them feeling like I’m back in a different time. Every now and again diners look up from their cappuccinos and lazily cast their eyes towards the water – and me. Continue reading...

    Travel | The Guardian / 8 d. 15 h. 52 min. ago more
  • Singer Imelda May on New Orleans: ‘It has magic and mystery and voodoo’Singer Imelda May on New Orleans: ‘It has magic and mystery and voodoo’

    Nola’s people, its doughnuts and po’ boy sandwiches, and above all its music make an intoxicating mix for the Irish singerGo to New Orleans and you get why so many people have written songs about it. There is nowhere else like it. It has magic and mystery and voodoo and it’s colourful in every way. I was immediately spellbound. Continue reading...

    Travel | The Guardian / 8 d. 17 h. 42 min. ago more
  • Vintage stuff: Belgium’s biggest flea marketVintage stuff: Belgium’s biggest flea market

    Tongeren, Belgium’s oldest town founded in the first century AD, is also home to a vast and fascinating flea market. Perfect for a weekend treasure huntI wake on Sunday morning in Tongeren like a kid on Christmas morning, wondering what goodies are waiting for me. This is the oldest town in Belgium, just 90 minutes from Brussels, and happily also hosts the biggest weekly antiques market in the Benelux region.Wandering out of Hotel Eburon – a modern design showcase fashioned from an old convent – the first thing I see is a woman in traditional Flemish costume, helping attract browsers to the vintage farmhouse paraphernalia she has spread out around her. In a nearby square, cafes offer coffee and pastries – plus morning beer (hey, this is Belgium) – to shoppers pausing from treasure hunting. Continue reading...

    Travel | The Guardian / 9 d. 16 h. 42 min. ago more
  • Striking Paris art deco swimming pool reopensStriking Paris art deco swimming pool reopens

    Henry Sauvage’s 87-year-old Piscine des Amiraux, featured in the film Amélie, has been restored to its former glory and is once again open to the publicParis’s Piscine des Amiraux, an art deco masterpiece that featured briefly in Jean-Pierre Jeunet’s 2001 French rom-com Amélie, has reopened to the public following a complete renovation.Since the historic swimming pool closed two years ago, €16.5m has been invested in its reconstruction, during which the 33-metre pool was completely demolished and rebuilt according to the original designs. Continue reading...

    Travel | The Guardian / 12 d. 14 h. 21 min. ago more